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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

various facetious interrogations upon her, as, for example, where 

the witness had acquired his prose style. She controlled herself, and 

answered meekly, "No." 

 

"Well, Ann Veronica Smith," the magistrate remarked when the case was 

all before him, "you're a good-looking, strong, respectable gell, and 

it's a pity you silly young wimmin can't find something better to do 

with your exuberance. Two-and-twenty! I can't imagine what your parents 

can be thinking about to let you get into these scrapes." 

 

Ann Veronica's mind was filled with confused unutterable replies. 

 

"You are persuaded to come and take part in these outrageous 

proceedings--many of you, I am convinced, have no idea whatever of 

their nature. I don't suppose you could tell me even the derivation of 

suffrage if I asked you. No! not even the derivation! But the fashion's 

been set and in it you must be." 

 

The men at the reporter's table lifted their eyebrows, smiled faintly, 

and leaned back to watch how she took her scolding. One with the 

appearance of a bald little gnome yawned agonizingly. They had got all 

this down already--they heard the substance of it now for the fourteenth 

time. The stipendiary would have done it all very differently. 

 

She found presently she was out of the dock and confronted with the 

alternative of being bound over in one surety for the sum of forty 

pounds--whatever that might mean or a month's imprisonment. 

 

"Second class," said some one, but first and second were all alike to 

her. She elected to go to prison. 

 

At last, after a long rumbling journey in a stuffy windowless van, she 

reached Canongate Prison--for Holloway had its quota already. It was bad 

luck to go to Canongate. 

 

Prison was beastly. Prison was bleak without spaciousness, and pervaded 

by a faint, oppressive smell; and she had to wait two hours in the 

sullenly defiant company of two unclean women thieves before a cell 

could be assigned to her. Its dreariness, like the filthiness of the 

police cell, was a discovery for her. She had imagined that prisons 

were white-tiled places, reeking of lime-wash and immaculately 

sanitary. Instead, they appeared to be at the hygienic level of tramps' 

lodging-houses. She was bathed in turbid water that had already been 

used. She was not allowed to bathe herself: another prisoner, with a 

privileged manner, washed her. Conscientious objectors to that process 

are not permitted, she found, in Canongate. Her hair was washed for her 


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