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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

that would have overwhelmed any normally feminine girl with shame and 

horror now became uppermost again. Before her was a great Gothic portal. 

Through that she had to go. 

 

Past her shot the little old lady in the bonnet, running incredibly 

fast, but otherwise still alertly respectable, and she was making a 

strange threatening sound as she ran, such as one would use in driving 

ducks out of a garden--"B-r-r-r-r-r--!" and pawing with black-gloved 

hands. The policemen were closing in from the sides to intervene. The 

little old lady struck like a projectile upon the resounding chest 

of the foremost of these, and then Ann Veronica had got past and was 

ascending the steps. 

 

Then most horribly she was clasped about the waist from behind and 

lifted from the ground. 

 

At that a new element poured into her excitement, an element of wild 

disgust and terror. She had never experienced anything so disagreeable 

in her life as the sense of being held helplessly off her feet. She 

screamed involuntarily--she had never in her life screamed before--and 

then she began to wriggle and fight like a frightened animal against the 

men who were holding her. 

 

The affair passed at one leap from a spree to a nightmare of violence 

and disgust. Her hair got loose, her hat came over one eye, and she had 

no arm free to replace it. She felt she must suffocate if these men did 

not put her down, and for a time they would not put her down. Then with 

an indescribable relief her feet were on the pavement, and she was 

being urged along by two policemen, who were gripping her wrists in an 

irresistible expert manner. She was writhing to get her hands loose 

and found herself gasping with passionate violence, "It's 

damnable!--damnable!" to the manifest disgust of the fatherly policeman 

on her right. 

 

Then they had released her arms and were trying to push her away. 

 

"You be off, missie," said the fatherly policeman. "This ain't no place 

for you." 

 

He pushed her a dozen yards along the greasy pavement with flat, 

well-trained hands that there seemed to be no opposing. Before her 

stretched blank spaces, dotted with running people coming toward her, 

and below them railings and a statue. She almost submitted to this 

ending of her adventure. But at the word "home" she turned again. 

 

"I won't go home," she said; "I won't!" and she evaded the clutch of the 

fatherly policeman and tried to thrust herself past him in the direction 


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