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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Part 4 

 

 

It was not Ann Veronica's fault that the night's work should have taken 

upon itself the forms of wild burlesque. She was in deadly earnest in 

everything she did. It seemed to her the last desperate attack upon the 

universe that would not let her live as she desired to live, that penned 

her in and controlled her and directed her and disapproved of her, the 

same invincible wrappering, the same leaden tyranny of a universe that 

she had vowed to overcome after that memorable conflict with her father 

at Morningside Park. 

 

She was listed for the raid--she was informed it was to be a raid upon 

the House of Commons, though no particulars were given her--and told to 

go alone to 14, Dexter Street, Westminster, and not to ask any policeman 

to direct her. 14, Dexter Street, Westminster, she found was not a house 

but a yard in an obscure street, with big gates and the name of Podgers 

& Carlo, Carriers and Furniture Removers, thereon. She was perplexed by 

this, and stood for some seconds in the empty street hesitating, until 

the appearance of another circumspect woman under the street lamp at the 

corner reassured her. In one of the big gates was a little door, and she 

rapped at this. It was immediately opened by a man with light eyelashes 

and a manner suggestive of restrained passion. "Come right in," he 

hissed under his breath, with the true conspirator's note, closed the 

door very softly and pointed, "Through there!" 

 

By the meagre light of a gas lamp she perceived a cobbled yard with four 

large furniture vans standing with horses and lamps alight. A slender 

young man, wearing glasses, appeared from the shadow of the nearest van. 

"Are you A, B, C, or D?" he asked. 

 

"They told me D," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"Through there," he said, and pointed with the pamphlet he was carrying. 

 

Ann Veronica found herself in a little stirring crowd of excited women, 

whispering and tittering and speaking in undertones. 

 

The light was poor, so that she saw their gleaming faces dimly and 

indistinctly. No one spoke to her. She stood among them, watching 

them and feeling curiously alien to them. The oblique ruddy lighting 

distorted them oddly, made queer bars and patches of shadow upon their 

clothes. "It's Kitty's idea," said one, "we are to go in the vans." 

 

"Kitty is wonderful," said another. 

 

"Wonderful!" 

 

"I have always longed for prison service," said a voice, "always. 

From the beginning. But it's only now I'm able to do it." 

 

A little blond creature close at hand suddenly gave way to a fit of 


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