Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"If we satisfy you?" 

 

"Then, if possible, I would like to go to prison." 

 

"It isn't nice going to prison." 

 

"It would suit me." 

 

"It isn't nice getting there." 

 

"That's a question of detail," said Ann Veronica. 

 

The tired woman looked quietly at her. "What are your objections?" she 

said. 

 

"It isn't objections exactly. I want to know what you are doing; how you 

think this work of yours really does serve women." 

 

"We are working for the equal citizenship of men and women," said the 

tired woman. "Women have been and are treated as the inferiors of men, 

we want to make them their equals." 

 

"Yes," said Ann Veronica, "I agree to that. But--" 

 

The tired woman raised her eyebrows in mild protest. 

 

"Isn't the question more complicated than that?" said Ann Veronica. 

 

"You could have a talk to Miss Kitty Brett this afternoon, if you liked. 

Shall I make an appointment for you?" 

 

Miss Kitty Brett was one of the most conspicuous leaders of the 

movement. Ann Veronica snatched at the opportunity, and spent most 

of the intervening time in the Assyrian Court of the British Museum, 

reading and thinking over a little book upon the feminist movement the 

tired woman had made her buy. She got a bun and some cocoa in the little 

refreshment-room, and then wandered through the galleries up-stairs, 

crowded with Polynesian idols and Polynesian dancing-garments, and all 

the simple immodest accessories to life in Polynesia, to a seat among 

the mummies. She was trying to bring her problems to a head, and her 

mind insisted upon being even more discursive and atmospheric than 

usual. It generalized everything she put to it. 

 

"Why should women be dependent on men?" she asked; and the question was 

at once converted into a system of variations upon the theme of "Why 

are things as they are?"--"Why are human beings viviparous?"--"Why are 

people hungry thrice a day?"--"Why does one faint at danger?" 

 

She stood for a time looking at the dry limbs and still human face of 

that desiccated unwrapped mummy from the very beginnings of social life. 

It looked very patient, she thought, and a little self-satisfied. It 

looked as if it had taken its world for granted and prospered on that 

assumption--a world in which children were trained to obey their 

elders and the wills of women over-ruled as a matter of course. It was 

wonderful to think this thing had lived, had felt and suffered. Perhaps 

once it had desired some other human being intolerably. Perhaps some one 


Page 4 from 6:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   Forward