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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

She followed Oxford Street into Holborn, and then she inquired for 

Chancery Lane. There she sought and at last found 107A, one of those 

heterogeneous piles of offices which occupy the eastern side of the 

lane. She studied the painted names of firms and persons and enterprises 

on the wall, and discovered that the Women's Bond of Freedom occupied 

several contiguous suites on the first floor. She went up-stairs and 

hesitated between four doors with ground-glass panes, each of which 

professed "The Women's Bond of Freedom" in neat black letters. She 

opened one and found herself in a large untidy room set with chairs that 

were a little disarranged as if by an overnight meeting. On the walls 

were notice-boards bearing clusters of newspaper slips, three or four 

big posters of monster meetings, one of which Ann Veronica had attended 

with Miss Miniver, and a series of announcements in purple copying-ink, 

and in one corner was a pile of banners. There was no one at all in this 

room, but through the half-open door of one of the small apartments 

that gave upon it she had a glimpse of two very young girls sitting at a 

littered table and writing briskly. 

 

She walked across to this apartment and, opening the door a little 

wider, discovered a press section of the movement at work. 

 

"I want to inquire," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"Next door," said a spectacled young person of seventeen or eighteen, 

with an impatient indication of the direction. 

 

In the adjacent apartment Ann Veronica found a middle-aged woman with 

a tired face under the tired hat she wore, sitting at a desk opening 

letters while a dusky, untidy girl of eight-or nine-and-twenty hammered 

industriously at a typewriter. The tired woman looked up in inquiring 

silence at Ann Veronica's diffident entry. 

 

"I want to know more about this movement," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"Are you with us?" said the tired woman. 

 

"I don't know," said Ann Veronica; "I think I am. I want very much to do 

something for women. But I want to know what you are doing." 

 

The tired woman sat still for a moment. "You haven't come here to make a 

lot of difficulties?" she asked. 

 

"No," said Ann Veronica, "but I want to know." 

 

The tired woman shut her eyes tightly for a moment, and then looked with 

them at Ann Veronica. "What can you do?" she asked. 

 

"Do?" 

 

"Are you prepared to do things for us? Distribute bills? Write letters? 

Interrupt meetings? Canvass at elections? Face dangers?" 

 

"If I am satisfied--" 


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