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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Capes, unable to escape from his image and the idea of his presence in 

her life. 

 

She let her mind run into dreams of that cloud paradise of an altered 

world in which the Goopes and Minivers, the Fabians and reforming people 

believed. Across that world was written in letters of light, "Endowment 

of Motherhood." Suppose in some complex yet conceivable way women were 

endowed, were no longer economically and socially dependent on men. "If 

one was free," she said, "one could go to him.... This vile hovering 

to catch a man's eye!... One could go to him and tell him one loved 

him. I want to love him. A little love from him would be enough. It 

would hurt no one. It would not burden him with any obligation." 

 

She groaned aloud and bowed her forehead to her knees. She floundered 

deep. She wanted to kiss his feet. His feet would have the firm texture 

of his hands. 

 

Then suddenly her spirit rose in revolt. "I will not have this slavery," 

she said. "I will not have this slavery." 

 

She shook her fist ceilingward. "Do you hear!" she said "whatever you 

are, wherever you are! I will not be slave to the thought of any man, 

slave to the customs of any time. Confound this slavery of sex! I am a 

man! I will get this under if I am killed in doing it!" 

 

She scowled into the cold blacknesses about her. 

 

"Manning," she said, and contemplated a figure of inaggressive 

persistence. "No!" Her thoughts had turned in a new direction. 

 

"It doesn't matter," she said, after a long interval, "if they are 

absurd. They mean something. They mean everything that women can 

mean--except submission. The vote is only the beginning, the necessary 

beginning. If we do not begin--" 

 

She had come to a resolution. Abruptly she got out of bed, smoothed 

her sheet and straightened her pillow and lay down, and fell almost 

instantly asleep. 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

The next morning was as dark and foggy as if it was mid-November instead 

of early March. Ann Veronica woke rather later than usual, and lay awake 

for some minutes before she remembered a certain resolution she 

had taken in the small hours. Then instantly she got out of bed and 

proceeded to dress. 

 

She did not start for the Imperial College. She spent the morning up 

to ten in writing a series of unsuccessful letters to Ramage, which she 

tore up unfinished; and finally she desisted and put on her jacket and 

went out into the lamp-lit obscurity and slimy streets. She turned a 

resolute face southward. 


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