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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

send him four five-pound notes. The rest she meant to keep for 

her immediate necessities. A little relieved by this step toward 

reinstatement, she went on to the Imperial College to forget her muddle 

of problems for a time, if she could, in the presence of Capes. 

 

 

 

 

Part 7 

 

 

For a time the biological laboratory was full of healing virtue. Her 

sleepless night had left her languid but not stupefied, and for an hour 

or so the work distracted her altogether from her troubles. 

 

Then, after Capes had been through her work and had gone on, it came to 

her that the fabric of this life of hers was doomed to almost immediate 

collapse; that in a little while these studies would cease, and perhaps 

she would never set eyes on him again. After that consolations fled. 

 

The overnight nervous strain began to tell; she became inattentive 

to the work before her, and it did not get on. She felt sleepy and 

unusually irritable. She lunched at a creamery in Great Portland Street, 

and as the day was full of wintry sunshine, spent the rest of the 

lunch-hour in a drowsy gloom, which she imagined to be thought upon the 

problems of her position, on a seat in Regent's Park. A girl of fifteen 

or sixteen gave her a handbill that she regarded as a tract until she 

saw "Votes for Women" at the top. That turned her mind to the more 

generalized aspects of her perplexities again. She had never been so 

disposed to agree that the position of women in the modern world is 

intolerable. 

 

Capes joined the students at tea, and displayed himself in an impish 

mood that sometimes possessed him. He did not notice that Ann Veronica 

was preoccupied and heavy-eyed. Miss Klegg raised the question of 

women's suffrage, and he set himself to provoke a duel between her and 

Miss Garvice. The youth with the hair brushed back and the spectacled 

Scotchman joined in the fray for and against the women's vote. 

 

Ever and again Capes appealed to Ann Veronica. He liked to draw her in, 

and she did her best to talk. But she did not talk readily, and in 

order to say something she plunged a little, and felt she plunged. 

Capes scored back with an uncompromising vigor that was his way of 

complimenting her intelligence. But this afternoon it discovered an 

unusual vein of irritability in her. He had been reading Belfort Bax, 

and declared himself a convert. He contrasted the lot of women in 

general with the lot of men, presented men as patient, self-immolating 


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