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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

insoluble individual problem again: "What am I to do?" 

 

She wanted first of all to fling the forty pounds back into Ramage's 

face. But she had spent nearly half of it, and had no conception of how 

such a sum could be made good again. She thought of all sorts of odd and 

desperate expedients, and with passionate petulance rejected them all. 

 

She took refuge in beating her pillow and inventing insulting epithets 

for herself. She got up, drew up her blind, and stared out of window at 

a dawn-cold vision of chimneys for a time, and then went and sat on the 

edge of her bed. What was the alternative to going home? No alternative 

appeared in that darkness. 

 

It seemed intolerable that she should go home and admit herself beaten. 

She did most urgently desire to save her face in Morningside Park, and 

for long hours she could think of no way of putting it that would not be 

in the nature of unconditional admission of defeat. 

 

"I'd rather go as a chorus-girl," she said. 

 

She was not very clear about the position and duties of a chorus-girl, 

but it certainly had the air of being a last desperate resort. 

There sprang from that a vague hope that perhaps she might extort a 

capitulation from her father by a threat to seek that position, and then 

with overwhelming clearness it came to her that whatever happened she 

would never be able to tell her father about her debt. The completest 

capitulation would not wipe out that trouble. And she felt that if she 

went home it was imperative to pay. She would always be going to and fro 

up the Avenue, getting glimpses of Ramage, seeing him in trains.... 

 

For a time she promenaded the room. 

 

"Why did I ever take that loan? An idiot girl in an asylum would have 

known better than that! 

 

"Vulgarity of soul and innocence of mind--the worst of all conceivable 

combinations. I wish some one would kill Ramage by accident!... 

 

"But then they would find that check endorsed in his bureau.... 

 

"I wonder what he will do?" She tried to imagine situations that might 

arise out of Ramage's antagonism, for he had been so bitter and savage 

that she could not believe that he would leave things as they were. 

 

The next morning she went out with her post-office savings bank-book, 

and telegraphed for a warrant to draw out all the money she had in the 

world. It amounted to two-and-twenty pounds. She addressed an envelope 

to Ramage, and scrawled on a half-sheet of paper, "The rest shall 

follow." The money would be available in the afternoon, and she would 


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