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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"You knew it," he added, in her momentary silence. 

 

"You said you were in love with me," said Ann Veronica; "I wanted to 

explain--" 

 

"I said I loved and wanted you." The brutality of his first astonishment 

was evaporating. "I am in love with you. You know I am in love with you. 

And then you go--and half throttle me.... I believe you've crushed a 

gland or something. It feels like it." 

 

"I am sorry," said Ann Veronica. "What else was I to do?" 

 

For some seconds she stood watching him and both were thinking very 

quickly. Her state of mind would have seemed altogether discreditable to 

her grandmother. She ought to have been disposed to faint and scream at 

all these happenings; she ought to have maintained a front of outraged 

dignity to veil the sinking of her heart. I would like to have to tell 

it so. But indeed that is not at all a good description of her attitude. 

She was an indignant queen, no doubt she was alarmed and disgusted 

within limits; but she was highly excited, and there was something, some 

low adventurous strain in her being, some element, subtle at least if 

base, going about the rioting ways and crowded insurgent meeting-places 

of her mind declaring that the whole affair was after all--they are the 

only words that express it--a very great lark indeed. At the bottom 

of her heart she was not a bit afraid of Ramage. She had unaccountable 

gleams of sympathy with and liking for him. And the grotesquest fact 

was that she did not so much loathe, as experience with a quite critical 

condemnation this strange sensation of being kissed. Never before had 

any human being kissed her lips.... 

 

It was only some hours after that these ambiguous elements evaporated 

and vanished and loathing came, and she really began to be thoroughly 

sick and ashamed of the whole disgraceful quarrel and scuffle. 

 

He, for his part, was trying to grasp the series of unexpected reactions 

that had so wrecked their tete-a-tete. He had meant to be master of his 

fate that evening and it had escaped him altogether. It had, as it were, 

blown up at the concussion of his first step. It dawned upon him that he 

had been abominably used by Ann Veronica. 

 

"Look here," he said, "I brought you here to make love to you." 

 

"I didn't understand--your idea of making love. You had better let me go 

again." 

 

"Not yet," he said. "I do love you. I love you all the more for the 

streak of sheer devil in you.... You are the most beautiful, the most 

desirable thing I have ever met in this world. It was good to kiss you, 


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