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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

glaring, immense, and full of resolution, a stupendous monster of an 

eye. 

 

She shut her lips hard, her jaw hardened, and she set herself to 

struggle with him. She wrenched her head away from his grip and got her 

arm between his chest and hers. They began to wrestle fiercely. Each 

became frightfully aware of the other as a plastic energetic body, 

of the strong muscles of neck against cheek, of hands gripping 

shoulder-blade and waist. "How dare you!" she panted, with her world 

screaming and grimacing insult at her. "How dare you!" 

 

They were both astonished at the other's strength. Perhaps Ramage was 

the more astonished. Ann Veronica had been an ardent hockey player and 

had had a course of jiu-jitsu in the High School. Her defence ceased 

rapidly to be in any sense ladylike, and became vigorous and effective; 

a strand of black hair that had escaped its hairpins came athwart 

Ramage's eyes, and then the knuckles of a small but very hardly clinched 

fist had thrust itself with extreme effectiveness and painfulness under 

his jawbone and ear. 

 

"Let go!" said Ann Veronica, through her teeth, strenuously inflicting 

agony, and he cried out sharply and let go and receded a pace. 

 

"NOW!" said Ann Veronica. "Why did you dare to do that?" 

 

 

 

Part 3 

 

 

Each of them stared at the other, set in a universe that had changed its 

system of values with kaleidoscopic completeness. She was flushed, and 

her eyes were bright and angry; her breath came sobbing, and her hair 

was all abroad in wandering strands of black. He too was flushed and 

ruffled; one side of his collar had slipped from its stud and he held a 

hand to the corner of his jaw. 

 

"You vixen!" said Mr. Ramage, speaking the simplest first thought of his 

heart. 

 

"You had no right--" panted Ann Veronica. 

 

"Why on earth," he asked, "did you hurt me like that?" 

 

Ann Veronica did her best to think she had not deliberately attempted to 

cause him pain. She ignored his question. 

 

"I never dreamt!" she said. 

 

"What on earth did you expect me to do, then?" he asked. 

 

 

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

Interpretation came pouring down upon her almost blindingly; she 

understood now the room, the waiter, the whole situation. She 

understood. She leaped to a world of shabby knowledge, of furtive base 

realizations. She wanted to cry out upon herself for the uttermost fool 

in existence. 

 

"I thought you wanted to have a talk to me," she said. 

 

"I wanted to make love to you. 


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