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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Part 2 

 

 

They had their explanations the next evening, but they were explanations 

in quite other terms than Ann Veronica had anticipated, quite other and 

much more startling and illuminating terms. Ramage came for her at her 

lodgings, and she met him graciously and kindly as a queen who knows she 

must needs give sorrow to a faithful liege. She was unusually soft 

and gentle in her manner to him. He was wearing a new silk hat, with a 

slightly more generous brim than its predecessor, and it suited his type 

of face, robbed his dark eyes a little of their aggressiveness and gave 

him a solid and dignified and benevolent air. A faint anticipation of 

triumph showed in his manner and a subdued excitement. 

 

"We'll go to a place where we can have a private room," he said. 

"Then--then we can talk things out." 

 

So they went this time to the Rococo, in Germain Street, and up-stairs 

to a landing upon which stood a bald-headed waiter with whiskers like a 

French admiral and discretion beyond all limits in his manner. He seemed 

to have expected them. He ushered them with an amiable flat hand into a 

minute apartment with a little gas-stove, a silk crimson-covered sofa, 

and a bright little table, gay with napery and hot-house flowers. 

 

"Odd little room," said Ann Veronica, dimly apprehending that obtrusive 

sofa. 

 

"One can talk without undertones, so to speak," said Ramage. 

"It's--private." He stood looking at the preparations before them with 

an unusual preoccupation of manner, then roused himself to take her 

jacket, a little awkwardly, and hand it to the waiter who hung it in the 

corner of the room. It appeared he had already ordered dinner and 

wine, and the whiskered waiter waved in his subordinate with the soup 

forthwith. 

 

"I'm going to talk of indifferent themes," said Ramage, a little 

fussily, "until these interruptions of the service are over. Then--then 

we shall be together.... How did you like Tristan?" 

 

Ann Veronica paused the fraction of a second before her reply came. 

 

"I thought much of it amazingly beautiful." 

 

"Isn't it. And to think that man got it all out of the poorest little 

love-story for a respectable titled lady! Have you read of it?" 

 

"Never." 

 

"It gives in a nutshell the miracle of art and the imagination. You get 

this queer irascible musician quite impossibly and unfortunately in 

love with a wealthy patroness, and then out of his brain comes THIS, a 

tapestry of glorious music, setting out love to lovers, lovers who love 


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