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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

reckoning...." 

 

His voice rose and fell amidst the music and the singing of Tristan and 

King Mark, like a voice heard in a badly connected telephone. She stared 

at his pleading face. 

 

She turned to the stage, and Tristan was wounded in Kurvenal's arms, 

with Isolde at his feet, and King Mark, the incarnation of masculine 

force and obligation, the masculine creditor of love and beauty, stood 

over him, and the second climax was ending in wreaths and reek of 

melodies; and then the curtain was coming down in a series of short 

rushes, the music had ended, and the people were stirring and breaking 

out into applause, and the lights of the auditorium were resuming. The 

lighting-up pierced the obscurity of the box, and Ramage stopped his 

urgent flow of words abruptly and sat back. This helped to restore Ann 

Veronica's self-command. 

 

She turned her eyes to him again, and saw her late friend and pleasant 

and trusted companion, who had seen fit suddenly to change into a lover, 

babbling interesting inacceptable things. He looked eager and flushed 

and troubled. His eyes caught at hers with passionate inquiries. "Tell 

me," he said; "speak to me." She realized it was possible to be sorry 

for him--acutely sorry for the situation. Of course this thing was 

absolutely impossible. But she was disturbed, mysteriously disturbed. 

She remembered abruptly that she was really living upon his money. She 

leaned forward and addressed him. 

 

"Mr. Ramage," she said, "please don't talk like this." 

 

He made to speak and did not. 

 

"I don't want you to do it, to go on talking to me. I don't want to hear 

you. If I had known that you had meant to talk like this I wouldn't have 

come here." 

 

"But how can I help it? How can I keep silence?" 

 

"Please!" she insisted. "Please not now." 

 

"I MUST talk with you. I must say what I have to say!" 

 

"But not now--not here." 

 

"It came," he said. "I never planned it--And now I have begun--" 

 

She felt acutely that he was entitled to explanations, and as acutely 

that explanations were impossible that night. She wanted to think. 

 

"Mr. Ramage," she said, "I can't--Not now. Will you please--Not now, or 

I must go." 

 

He stared at her, trying to guess at the mystery of her thoughts. 

 

"You don't want to go?" 

 

"No. But I must--I ought--" 

 

"I MUST talk about this. Indeed I must." 

 

"Not now." 

 

"But I love you. I love you--unendurably." 

 

"Then don't talk to me now. I don't want you to talk to me now. There is 


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