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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

"I wish you and I had drunk that love potion," he said. 

 

She found no ready reply to that, and he went on: "This music is the 

food of love. It makes me desire life beyond measure. Life! Life and 

love! It makes me want to be always young, always strong, always 

devoting my life--and dying splendidly." 

 

"It is very beautiful," said Ann Veronica in a low tone. 

 

They said no more for a moment, and each was now acutely aware of the 

other. Ann Veronica was excited and puzzled, with a sense of a strange 

and disconcerting new light breaking over her relations with Ramage. 

She had never thought of him at all in that way before. It did not shock 

her; it amazed her, interested her beyond measure. But also this must 

not go on. She felt he was going to say something more--something 

still more personal and intimate. She was curious, and at the same time 

clearly resolved she must not hear it. She felt she must get him talking 

upon some impersonal theme at any cost. She snatched about in her mind. 

"What is the exact force of a motif?" she asked at random. "Before I 

heard much Wagnerian music I heard enthusiastic descriptions of it from 

a mistress I didn't like at school. She gave me an impression of a sort 

of patched quilt; little bits of patterned stuff coming up again and 

again." 

 

She stopped with an air of interrogation. 

 

Ramage looked at her for a long and discriminating interval without 

speaking. He seemed to be hesitating between two courses of action. "I 

don't know much about the technique of music," he said at last, with his 

eyes upon her. "It's a matter of feeling with me." 

 

He contradicted himself by plunging into an exposition of motifs. 

 

By a tacit agreement they ignored the significant thing between them, 

ignored the slipping away of the ground on which they had stood together 

hitherto.... 

 

All through the love music of the second act, until the hunting horns of 

Mark break in upon the dream, Ann Veronica's consciousness was flooded 

with the perception of a man close beside her, preparing some new thing 

to say to her, preparing, perhaps, to touch her, stretching hungry 

invisible tentacles about her. She tried to think what she should do in 

this eventuality or that. Her mind had been and was full of the thought 

of Capes, a huge generalized Capes-lover. And in some incomprehensible 

way, Ramage was confused with Capes; she had a grotesque disposition to 

persuade herself that this was really Capes who surrounded her, as it 


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