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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

happy, and began to talk of the smilax and pinks that adorned the table. 

He filled her glass with champagne. "You MUST," he said, "because of my 

depression." 

 

They were eating quails when they returned to the topic of love. "What 

made you think" he said, abruptly, with the gleam of avidity in his 

face, "that love makes people happy?" 

 

"I know it must." 

 

"But how?" 

 

He was, she thought, a little too insistent. "Women know these things by 

instinct," she answered. 

 

"I wonder," he said, "if women do know things by instinct? I have 

my doubts about feminine instinct. It's one of our conventional 

superstitions. A woman is supposed to know when a man is in love with 

her. Do you think she does?" 

 

Ann Veronica picked among her salad with a judicial expression of face. 

"I think she would," she decided. 

 

"Ah!" said Ramage, impressively. 

 

Ann Veronica looked up at him and found him regarding her with eyes that 

were almost woebegone, and into which, indeed, he was trying to throw 

much more expression than they could carry. There was a little pause 

between them, full for Ann Veronica of rapid elusive suspicions and 

intimations. 

 

"Perhaps one talks nonsense about a woman's instinct," she said. "It's 

a way of avoiding explanations. And girls and women, perhaps, are 

different. I don't know. I don't suppose a girl can tell if a man is in 

love with her or not in love with her." Her mind went off to Capes. Her 

thoughts took words for themselves. "She can't. I suppose it depends on 

her own state of mind. If one wants a thing very much, perhaps one is 

inclined to think one can't have it. I suppose if one were to love some 

one, one would feel doubtful. And if one were to love some one very 

much, it's just so that one would be blindest, just when one wanted most 

to see." 

 

She stopped abruptly, afraid that Ramage might be able to infer Capes 

from the things she had said, and indeed his face was very eager. 

 

"Yes?" he said. 

 

Ann Veronica blushed. "That's all," she said "I'm afraid I'm a little 

confused about these things." 

 

Ramage looked at her, and then fell into deep reflection as the waiter 

came to paragraph their talk again. 

 

"Have you ever been to the opera, Ann Veronica?" said Ramage. 

 

"Once or twice." 

 

"Shall we go now?" 

 

"I think I would like to listen to music. What is there?" 

 

"Tristan." 

 

"I've never heard Tristan and Isolde." 

 

"That settles it. We'll go. There's sure to be a place somewhere." 


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