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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

CHAPTER THE NINTH 

 

DISCORDS 

 

Part 1 

 

One afternoon, soon after Ann Veronica's great discovery, a telegram 

came into the laboratory for her. It ran: 

 

--------------------------------------------------- 

| Bored | and | nothing | to | do | 

|----------|-----------|----------|--------|--------| 

| will | you | dine | with | me | 

|----------|-----------|----------|--------|--------| 

| to-night | somewhere | and | talk | I | 

|----------|-----------|----------|--------|--------| 

| shall | be | grateful | Ramage | | 

--------------------------------------------------- 

 

Ann Veronica was rather pleased by this. She had not seen Ramage for ten 

or eleven days, and she was quite ready for a gossip with him. And now 

her mind was so full of the thought that she was in love--in love!--that 

marvellous state! that I really believe she had some dim idea of talking 

to him about it. At any rate, it would be good to hear him saying the 

sort of things he did--perhaps now she would grasp them better--with 

this world-shaking secret brandishing itself about inside her head 

within a yard of him. 

 

She was sorry to find Ramage a little disposed to be melancholy. 

 

"I have made over seven hundred pounds in the last week," he said. 

 

"That's exhilarating," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"Not a bit of it," he said; "it's only a score in a game." 

 

"It's a score you can buy all sorts of things with." 

 

"Nothing that one wants." 

 

He turned to the waiter, who held a wine-card. "Nothing can cheer me," 

he said, "except champagne." He meditated. "This," he said, and then: 

"No! Is this sweeter? Very well." 

 

"Everything goes well with me," he said, folding his arms under him and 

regarding Ann Veronica with the slightly projecting eyes wide open. "And 

I'm not happy. I believe I'm in love." 

 

He leaned back for his soup. 

 

Presently he resumed: "I believe I must be in love." 

 

"You can't be that," said Ann Veronica, wisely. 

 

"How do you know?" 

 

"Well, it isn't exactly a depressing state, is it?" 

 

"YOU don't know." 

 

"One has theories," said Ann Veronica, radiantly. 

 

"Oh, theories! Being in love is a fact." 

 

"It ought to make one happy." 

 

"It's an unrest--a longing--What's that?" The waiter had intervened. 

"Parmesan--take it away!" 

 

He glanced at Ann Veronica's face, and it seemed to him that she really 

was exceptionally radiant. He wondered why she thought love made people 


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