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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

way and that. 

 

"Why should one pretend?" she whispered. "Why should one pretend? 

 

"Think of all the beauty in the world that is covered up and overlaid." 

 

She glanced shyly at the mirror above her dressing-table, and then about 

her at the furniture, as though it might penetrate to the thoughts that 

peeped in her mind. 

 

"I wonder," said Ann Veronica at last, "if I am beautiful? I wonder if I 

shall ever shine like a light, like a translucent goddess?-- 

 

"I wonder-- 

 

"I suppose girls and women have prayed for this, have come to this--In 

Babylon, in Nineveh. 

 

"Why shouldn't one face the facts of one's self?" 

 

She stood up. She posed herself before her mirror and surveyed herself 

with gravely thoughtful, gravely critical, and yet admiring eyes. "And, 

after all, I am just one common person!" 

 

She watched the throb of the arteries in the stem of her neck, and 

put her hand at last gently and almost timidly to where her heart beat 

beneath her breast. 

 

 

 

Part 9 

 

 

The realization that she was in love flooded Ann Veronica's mind, and 

altered the quality of all its topics. 

 

She began to think persistently of Capes, and it seemed to her now that 

for some weeks at least she must have been thinking persistently of 

him unawares. She was surprised to find how stored her mind was with 

impressions and memories of him, how vividly she remembered his gestures 

and little things that he had said. It occurred to her that it was 

absurd and wrong to be so continuously thinking of one engrossing topic, 

and she made a strenuous effort to force her mind to other questions. 

 

But it was extraordinary what seemingly irrelevant things could restore 

her to the thought of Capes again. And when she went to sleep, then 

always Capes became the novel and wonderful guest of her dreams. 

 

For a time it really seemed all-sufficient to her that she should love. 

That Capes should love her seemed beyond the compass of her imagination. 

Indeed, she did not want to think of him as loving her. She wanted to 

think of him as her beloved person, to be near him and watch him, 

to have him going about, doing this and that, saying this and that, 

unconscious of her, while she too remained unconscious of herself. To 

think of him as loving her would make all that different. Then he would 

turn his face to her, and she would have to think of herself in his 

eyes. She would become defensive--what she did would be the thing that 

mattered. He would require things of her, and she would be passionately 


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