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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

had determined from the outset to have the warmest affection for her 

youngest niece and to be a second mother in her life--a second and a 

better one; but she had found much to battle with, and there was much in 

herself that Ann Veronica failed to understand. She came in now with an 

air of reserved solicitude. 

 

Mr. Stanley pointed to the letter with a pipe he had drawn from his 

jacket pocket. "What do you think of that?" he asked. 

 

She took it up in her many-ringed hands and read it judicially. He 

filled his pipe slowly. 

 

"Yes," she said at last, "it is firm and affectionate." 

 

"I could have said more." 

 

"You seem to have said just what had to be said. It seems to me exactly 

what is wanted. She really must not go to that affair." 

 

She paused, and he waited for her to speak. 

 

"I don't think she quite sees the harm of those people or the sort of 

life to which they would draw her," she said. "They would spoil every 

chance." 

 

"She has chances?" he said, helping her out. 

 

"She is an extremely attractive girl," she said; and added, "to some 

people. Of course, one doesn't like to talk about things until there are 

things to talk about." 

 

"All the more reason why she shouldn't get herself talked about." 

 

"That is exactly what I feel." 

 

Mr. Stanley took the letter and stood with it in his hand thoughtfully 

for a time. "I'd give anything," he remarked, "to see our little Vee 

happily and comfortably married." 

 

He gave the note to the parlormaid the next morning in an inadvertent, 

casual manner just as he was leaving the house to catch his London 

train. When Ann Veronica got it she had at first a wild, fantastic idea 

that it contained a tip. 

 


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