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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

the crude unthinking criticism of youth. You have no grasp upon the 

essential facts of life (I pray God you never may), and in your rash 

ignorance you are prepared to dash into positions that may end in 

lifelong regret. The life of a young girl is set about with prowling 

pitfalls." 

 

He was arrested for a moment by an indistinct picture of Veronica 

reading this last sentence. But he was now too deeply moved to trace 

a certain unsatisfactoriness to its source in a mixture of metaphors. 

"Well," he said, argumentatively, "it IS. That's all about it. It's time 

she knew." 

 

"The life of a young girl is set about with prowling pitfalls, from 

which she must be shielded at all costs." 

 

His lips tightened, and he frowned with solemn resolution. 

 

"So long as I am your father, so long as your life is entrusted to my 

care, I feel bound by every obligation to use my authority to check this 

odd disposition of yours toward extravagant enterprises. A day will come 

when you will thank me. It is not, my dear Veronica, that I think there 

is any harm in you; there is not. But a girl is soiled not only by evil 

but by the proximity of evil, and a reputation for rashness may do 

her as serious an injury as really reprehensible conduct. So do please 

believe that in this matter I am acting for the best." 

 

He signed his name and reflected. Then he opened the study door and 

called "Mollie!" and returned to assume an attitude of authority on the 

hearthrug, before the blue flames and orange glow of the gas fire. 

 

His sister appeared. 

 

She was dressed in one of those complicated dresses that are all lace 

and work and confused patternings of black and purple and cream about 

the body, and she was in many ways a younger feminine version of the 

same theme as himself. She had the same sharp nose--which, indeed, only 

Ann Veronica, of all the family, had escaped. She carried herself well, 

whereas her brother slouched, and there was a certain aristocratic 

dignity about her that she had acquired through her long engagement to 

a curate of family, a scion of the Wiltshire Edmondshaws. He had died 

before they married, and when her brother became a widower she had 

come to his assistance and taken over much of the care of his youngest 

daughter. But from the first her rather old-fashioned conception of life 

had jarred with the suburban atmosphere, the High School spirit and the 

memories of the light and little Mrs. Stanley, whose family had been by 

any reckoning inconsiderable--to use the kindliest term. Miss Stanley 


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