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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

disposition to carry her scientific ambitions to unwomanly lengths. She 

seemed to think he was merely the paymaster, handing over the means 

of her freedom. And now she insisted that she MUST leave the chastened 

security of the Tredgold Women's College for Russell's unbridled 

classes, and wanted to go to fancy dress dances in pirate costume and 

spend the residue of the night with Widgett's ramshackle girls in some 

indescribable hotel in Soho! 

 

He had done his best not to think about her at all, but the situation 

and his sister had become altogether too urgent. He had finally put 

aside The Lilac Sunbonnet, gone into his study, lit the gas fire, and 

written the letter that had brought these unsatisfactory relations to a 

head. 

 

Part 4 

 

MY DEAR VEE, he wrote. 

 

These daughters! He gnawed his pen and reflected, tore the sheet up, and 

began again. 

 

"MY DEAR VERONICA,--Your aunt tells me you have involved yourself in 

some arrangement with the Widgett girls about a Fancy Dress Ball in 

London. I gather you wish to go up in some fantastic get-up, wrapped 

about in your opera cloak, and that after the festivities you propose to 

stay with these friends of yours, and without any older people in your 

party, at an hotel. Now I am sorry to cross you in anything you have set 

your heart upon, but I regret to say--" 

 

"H'm," he reflected, and crossed out the last four words. 

 

"--but this cannot be." 

 

"No," he said, and tried again: "but I must tell you quite definitely 

that I feel it to be my duty to forbid any such exploit." 

 

"Damn!" he remarked at the defaced letter; and, taking a fresh sheet, he 

recopied what he had written. A certain irritation crept into his manner 

as he did so. 

 

"I regret that you should ever have proposed it," he went on. 

 

He meditated, and began a new paragraph. 

 

"The fact of it is, and this absurd project of yours only brings it to 

a head, you have begun to get hold of some very queer ideas about what a 

young lady in your position may or may not venture to do. I do not think 

you quite understand my ideals or what is becoming as between father and 

daughter. Your attitude to me--" 

 

He fell into a brown study. It was so difficult to put precisely. 

 

"--and your aunt--" 

 

For a time he searched for the mot juste. Then he went on: 

 

"--and, indeed, to most of the established things in life is, frankly, 

unsatisfactory. You are restless, aggressive, critical with all 


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