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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Part 3 

 

 

Ann Veronica's father was a solicitor with a good deal of company 

business: a lean, trustworthy, worried-looking, neuralgic, clean-shaven 

man of fifty-three, with a hard mouth, a sharp nose, iron-gray hair, 

gray eyes, gold-framed glasses, and a small, circular baldness at the 

crown of his head. His name was Peter. He had had five children at 

irregular intervals, of whom Ann Veronica was the youngest, so that as 

a parent he came to her perhaps a little practised and jaded and 

inattentive; and he called her his "little Vee," and patted her 

unexpectedly and disconcertingly, and treated her promiscuously as of 

any age between eleven and eight-and-twenty. The City worried him a good 

deal, and what energy he had left over he spent partly in golf, a game 

he treated very seriously, and partly in the practices of microscopic 

petrography. 

 

He "went in" for microscopy in the unphilosophical Victorian manner as 

his "hobby." A birthday present of a microscope had turned his mind to 

technical microscopy when he was eighteen, and a chance friendship with 

a Holborn microscope dealer had confirmed that bent. He had remarkably 

skilful fingers and a love of detailed processes, and he had become one 

of the most dexterous amateur makers of rock sections in the world. 

He spent a good deal more money and time than he could afford upon the 

little room at the top of the house, in producing new lapidary apparatus 

and new microscopic accessories and in rubbing down slices of rock to 

a transparent thinness and mounting them in a beautiful and dignified 

manner. He did it, he said, "to distract his mind." His chief successes 

he exhibited to the Lowndean Microscopical Society, where their high 

technical merit never failed to excite admiration. Their scientific 

value was less considerable, since he chose rocks entirely with a 

view to their difficulty of handling or their attractiveness at 

conversaziones when done. He had a great contempt for the sections the 

"theorizers" produced. They proved all sorts of things perhaps, but they 

were thick, unequal, pitiful pieces of work. Yet an indiscriminating, 

wrong-headed world gave such fellows all sorts of distinctions.... 

 

He read but little, and that chiefly healthy light fiction with 

chromatic titles, The Red Sword, The Black Helmet, The Purple Robe, also 

in order "to distract his mind." He read it in winter in the evening 

after dinner, and Ann Veronica associated it with a tendency to 

monopolize the lamp, and to spread a very worn pair of dappled fawn-skin 


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