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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

The thought of beauty became an obsession. It interwove with her 

biological work. She found herself asking more and more curiously, "Why, 

on the principle of the survival of the fittest, have I any sense of 

beauty at all?" That enabled her to go on thinking about beauty when it 

seemed to her right that she should be thinking about biology. 

 

She was very greatly exercised by the two systems of values--the two 

series of explanations that her comparative anatomy on the one hand and 

her sense of beauty on the other, set going in her thoughts. She could 

not make up her mind which was the finer, more elemental thing, which 

gave its values to the other. Was it that the struggle of things 

to survive produced as a sort of necessary by-product these intense 

preferences and appreciations, or was it that some mystical outer thing, 

some great force, drove life beautyward, even in spite of expediency, 

regardless of survival value and all the manifest discretions of life? 

She went to Capes with that riddle and put it to him very carefully and 

clearly, and he talked well--he always talked at some length when she 

took a difficulty to him--and sent her to a various literature upon the 

markings of butterflies, the incomprehensible elaboration and splendor 

of birds of Paradise and humming-birds' plumes, the patterning of 

tigers, and a leopard's spots. He was interesting and inconclusive, and 

the original papers to which he referred her discursive were at best 

only suggestive. Afterward, one afternoon, he hovered about her, and 

came and sat beside her and talked of beauty and the riddle of beauty 

for some time. He displayed a quite unprofessional vein of mysticism in 

the matter. He contrasted with Russell, whose intellectual methods were, 

so to speak, sceptically dogmatic. Their talk drifted to the beauty of 

music, and they took that up again at tea-time. 

 

But as the students sat about Miss Garvice's tea-pot and drank tea or 

smoked cigarettes, the talk got away from Capes. The Scotchman informed 

Ann Veronica that your view of beauty necessarily depended on your 

metaphysical premises, and the young man with the Russell-like hair 

became anxious to distinguish himself by telling the Japanese student 

that Western art was symmetrical and Eastern art asymmetrical, and that 

among the higher organisms the tendency was toward an external symmetry 

veiling an internal want of balance. Ann Veronica decided she would have 


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