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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"Soul to soul." 

 

She turned her face to the fire, gripped her hands upon her elbows, and 

drew her thin shoulders together in a shrug. "Ugh!" she said. 

 

Ann Veronica watched her and wondered about her. 

 

"We do not want the men," said Miss Miniver; "we do not want them, with 

their sneers and loud laughter. Empty, silly, coarse brutes. Brutes! 

They are the brute still with us! Science some day may teach us a way 

to do without them. It is only the women matter. It is not every sort of 

creature needs--these males. Some have no males." 

 

"There's green-fly," admitted Ann Veronica. "And even then--" 

 

The conversation hung for a thoughtful moment. 

 

Ann Veronica readjusted her chin on her hand. "I wonder which of us is 

right," she said. "I haven't a scrap--of this sort of aversion." 

 

"Tolstoy is so good about this," said Miss Miniver, regardless of her 

friend's attitude. "He sees through it all. The Higher Life and the 

Lower. He sees men all defiled by coarse thoughts, coarse ways of living 

cruelties. Simply because they are hardened by--by bestiality, 

and poisoned by the juices of meat slain in anger and fermented 

drinks--fancy! drinks that have been swarmed in by thousands and 

thousands of horrible little bacteria!" 

 

"It's yeast," said Ann Veronica--"a vegetable." 

 

"It's all the same," said Miss Miniver. "And then they are swollen up 

and inflamed and drunken with matter. They are blinded to all fine 

and subtle things--they look at life with bloodshot eyes and dilated 

nostrils. They are arbitrary and unjust and dogmatic and brutish and 

lustful." 

 

"But do you really think men's minds are altered by the food they eat?" 

 

"I know it," said Miss Miniver. "Experte credo. When I am leading a true 

life, a pure and simple life free of all stimulants and excitements, I 

think--I think--oh! with pellucid clearness; but if I so much as take a 

mouthful of meat--or anything--the mirror is all blurred." 

 

 

 

Part 6 

 

 

Then, arising she knew not how, like a new-born appetite, came a craving 

in Ann Veronica for the sight and sound of beauty. 

 

It was as if her aesthetic sense had become inflamed. Her mind turned 

and accused itself of having been cold and hard. She began to look for 

beauty and discover it in unexpected aspects and places. Hitherto she 

had seen it chiefly in pictures and other works of art, incidentally, 

and as a thing taken out of life. Now the sense of beauty was spreading 

to a multitude of hitherto unsuspected aspects of the world about her. 


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