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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

mental austerity. Here was an experienced man of the world, her friend, 

who evidently took a great interest in this supreme topic and was 

willing to give her the benefit of his experiences! Why should not she 

be at her ease with him? Why should not she know things? It is hard 

enough anyhow for a human being to learn, she decided, but it is a dozen 

times more difficult than it need be because of all this locking of the 

lips and thoughts. 

 

She contrived to break down the barriers of shyness at last in one 

direction, and talked one night of love and the facts of love with Miss 

Miniver. 

 

But Miss Miniver was highly unsatisfactory. She repeated phrases of Mrs. 

Goopes's: "Advanced people," she said, with an air of great elucidation, 

"tend to GENERALIZE love. 'He prayeth best who loveth best--all things 

both great and small.' For my own part I go about loving." 

 

"Yes, but men;" said Ann Veronica, plunging; "don't you want the love of 

men?" 

 

For some seconds they remained silent, both shocked by this question. 

 

Miss Miniver looked over her glasses at her friend almost balefully. 

"NO!" she said, at last, with something in her voice that reminded Ann 

Veronica of a sprung tennis-racket. 

 

"I've been through all that," she went on, after a pause. 

 

She spoke slowly. "I have never yet met a man whose intellect I could 

respect." 

 

Ann Veronica looked at her thoughtfully for a moment, and decided to 

persist on principle. 

 

"But if you had?" she said. 

 

"I can't imagine it," said Miss Miniver. "And think, think"--her voice 

sank--"of the horrible coarseness!" 

 

"What coarseness?" said Ann Veronica. 

 

"My dear Vee!" Her voice became very low. "Don't you know?" 

 

"Oh! I know--" 

 

"Well--" Her face was an unaccustomed pink. 

 

Ann Veronica ignored her friend's confusion. 

 

"Don't we all rather humbug about the coarseness? All we women, I mean," 

said she. She decided to go on, after a momentary halt. "We pretend 

bodies are ugly. Really they are the most beautiful things in the world. 

We pretend we never think of everything that makes us what we are." 

 

"No," cried Miss Miniver, almost vehemently. "You are wrong! I did not 

think you thought such things. Bodies! Bodies! Horrible things! We are 

souls. Love lives on a higher plane. We are not animals. If ever I 

did meet a man I could love, I should love him"--her voice dropped 

again--"platonically." 

 

She made her glasses glint. "Absolutely platonically," she said. 


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