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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

 

 

Part 5 

 

 

Yet Ann Veronica was thinking a very great deal about love. A dozen 

shynesses and intellectual barriers were being outflanked or broken 

down in her mind. All the influences about her worked with her own 

predisposition and against all the traditions of her home and upbringing 

to deal with the facts of life in an unabashed manner. Ramage, by a 

hundred skilful hints had led her to realize that the problem of her own 

life was inseparably associated with, and indeed only one special case 

of, the problems of any woman's life, and that the problem of a woman's 

life is love. 

 

"A young man comes into life asking how best he may place himself," 

Ramage had said; "a woman comes into life thinking instinctively how 

best she may give herself." 

 

She noted that as a good saying, and it germinated and spread tentacles 

of explanation through her brain. The biological laboratory, perpetually 

viewing life as pairing and breeding and selection, and again pairing 

and breeding, seemed only a translated generalization of that assertion. 

And all the talk of the Miniver people and the Widgett people seemed 

always to be like a ship in adverse weather on the lee shore of love. 

"For seven years," said Ann Veronica, "I have been trying to keep myself 

from thinking about love.... 

 

"I have been training myself to look askance at beautiful things." 

 

She gave herself permission now to look at this squarely. She made 

herself a private declaration of liberty. "This is mere nonsense, mere 

tongue-tied fear!" she said. "This is the slavery of the veiled life. 

I might as well be at Morningside Park. This business of love is the 

supreme affair in life, it is the woman's one event and crisis that 

makes up for all her other restrictions, and I cower--as we all 

cower--with a blushing and paralyzed mind until it overtakes me!... 

 

"I'll be hanged if I do." 

 

But she could not talk freely about love, she found, for all that 

manumission. 

 

Ramage seemed always fencing about the forbidden topic, probing for 

openings, and she wondered why she did not give him them. But something 

instinctive prevented that, and with the finest resolve not to be 

"silly" and prudish she found that whenever he became at all bold 

in this matter she became severely scientific and impersonal, almost 

entomological indeed, in her method; she killed every remark as he made 

it and pinned it out for examination. In the biological laboratory that 

was their invincible tone. But she disapproved more and more of her own 


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