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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

was irritatingly judicial in the matter, neither absurdly against, in 

which case one might have smashed him, or hopelessly undecided, but 

tepidly sceptical. Miss Klegg and the youngest girl made a vigorous 

attack on Miss Garvice, who had said she thought women lost something 

infinitely precious by mingling in the conflicts of life. The discussion 

wandered, and was punctuated with bread and butter. Capes was inclined 

to support Miss Klegg until Miss Garvice cornered him by quoting him 

against himself, and citing a recent paper in the Nineteenth Century, in 

which, following Atkinson, he had made a vigorous and damaging attack 

on Lester Ward's case for the primitive matriarchate and the predominant 

importance of the female throughout the animal kingdom. 

 

Ann Veronica was not aware of this literary side of her teacher; she had 

a little tinge of annoyance at Miss Garvice's advantage. Afterwards 

she hunted up the article in question, and it seemed to her quite 

delightfully written and argued. Capes had the gift of easy, unaffected 

writing, coupled with very clear and logical thinking, and to follow 

his written thought gave her the sensation of cutting things with a 

perfectly new, perfectly sharp knife. She found herself anxious to read 

more of him, and the next Wednesday she went to the British Museum and 

hunted first among the half-crown magazines for his essays and then 

through various scientific quarterlies for his research papers. The 

ordinary research paper, when it is not extravagant theorizing, is apt 

to be rather sawdusty in texture, and Ann Veronica was delighted to find 

the same easy and confident luminosity that distinguished his work for 

the general reader. She returned to these latter, and at the back of 

her mind, as she looked them over again, was a very distinct resolve 

to quote them after the manner of Miss Garvice at the very first 

opportunity. 

 

When she got home to her lodgings that evening she reflected with 

something like surprise upon her half-day's employment, and decided 

that it showed nothing more nor less than that Capes was a really very 

interesting person indeed. 

 

And then she fell into a musing about Capes. She wondered why he was so 

distinctive, so unlike other men, and it never occurred to her for some 

time that this might be because she was falling in love with him. 

 


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