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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

 

"It prevents a treaty." 

 

"Couldn't _I_ make a treaty?" 

 

Ann Veronica thought, and could not see any possible treaty that would 

leave it open for her to have quasi-surreptitious dinners with Ramage 

or go on walking round the London squares discussing Socialism with Miss 

Miniver toward the small hours. She had tasted freedom now, and so far 

she had not felt the need of protection. Still, there certainly was 

something in the idea of a treaty. 

 

"I don't see at all how you can be managing," said Miss Stanley, and Ann 

Veronica hastened to reply, "I do on very little." Her mind went back to 

that treaty. 

 

"And aren't there fees to pay at the Imperial College?" her aunt was 

saying--a disagreeable question. 

 

"There are a few fees." 

 

"Then how have you managed?" 

 

"Bother!" said Ann Veronica to herself, and tried not to look guilty. "I 

was able to borrow the money." 

 

"Borrow the money! But who lent you the money?" 

 

"A friend," said Ann Veronica. 

 

She felt herself getting into a corner. She sought hastily in her mind 

for a plausible answer to an obvious question that didn't come. Her aunt 

went off at a tangent. "But my dear Ann Veronica, you will be getting 

into debt!" 

 

Ann Veronica at once, and with a feeling of immense relief, took refuge 

in her dignity. "I think, aunt," she said, "you might trust to my 

self-respect to keep me out of that." 

 

For the moment her aunt could not think of any reply to this 

counterstroke, and Ann Veronica followed up her advantage by a sudden 

inquiry about her abandoned boots. 

 

But in the train going home her aunt reasoned it out. 

 

"If she is borrowing money," said Miss Stanley, "she MUST be getting 

into debt. It's all nonsense...." 

 

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

It was by imperceptible degrees that Capes became important in Ann 

Veronica's thoughts. But then he began to take steps, and, at last, 

strides to something more and more like predominance. She began by being 

interested in his demonstrations and his biological theory, then she was 

attracted by his character, and then, in a manner, she fell in love with 

his mind. 

 

One day they were at tea in the laboratory and a discussion sprang up 

about the question of women's suffrage. The movement was then in its 

earlier militant phases, and one of the women only, Miss Garvice, 

opposed it, though Ann Veronica was disposed to be lukewarm. But a man's 

opposition always inclined her to the suffrage side; she had a curious 

feeling of loyalty in seeing the more aggressive women through. Capes 


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