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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Part 3 

 

 

For a time Ann Veronica's family had desisted from direct offers of a 

free pardon; they were evidently waiting for her resources to come to 

an end. Neither father, aunt, nor brothers made a sign, and then 

one afternoon in early February her aunt came up in a state between 

expostulation and dignified resentment, but obviously very anxious for 

Ann Veronica's welfare. "I had a dream in the night," she said. "I saw 

you in a sort of sloping, slippery place, holding on by your hands and 

slipping. You seemed to me to be slipping and slipping, and your face 

was white. It was really most vivid, most vivid! You seemed to be 

slipping and just going to tumble and holding on. It made me wake up, 

and there I lay thinking of you, spending your nights up here all alone, 

and no one to look after you. I wondered what you could be doing and 

what might be happening to you. I said to myself at once, 'Either this 

is a coincidence or the caper sauce.' But I made sure it was you. I felt 

I MUST do something anyhow, and up I came just as soon as I could to see 

you." 

 

She had spoken rather rapidly. "I can't help saying it," she said, with 

the quality of her voice altering, "but I do NOT think it is right for 

an unprotected girl to be in London alone as you are." 

 

"But I'm quite equal to taking care of myself, aunt." 

 

"It must be most uncomfortable here. It is most uncomfortable for every 

one concerned." 

 

She spoke with a certain asperity. She felt that Ann Veronica had duped 

her in that dream, and now that she had come up to London she might as 

well speak her mind. 

 

"No Christmas dinner," she said, "or anything nice! One doesn't even 

know what you are doing." 

 

"I'm going on working for my degree." 

 

"Why couldn't you do that at home?" 

 

"I'm working at the Imperial College. You see, aunt, it's the only 

possible way for me to get a good degree in my subjects, and father 

won't hear of it. There'd only be endless rows if I was at home. And how 

could I come home--when he locks me in rooms and all that?" 

 

"I do wish this wasn't going on," said Miss Stanley, after a pause. "I 

do wish you and your father could come to some agreement." 

 

Ann Veronica responded with conviction: "I wish so, too." 

 

"Can't we arrange something? Can't we make a sort of treaty?" 

 

"He wouldn't keep it. He would get very cross one evening and no one 

would dare to remind him of it." 

 

"How can you say such things?" 

 

"But he would!" 

 

"Still, it isn't your place to say so." 


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