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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

and what it might mean in a human life. Ann Veronica thought it was 

a spontaneous release of energy expressive of well-being, but Ramage 

thought that by dancing, men, and such birds and animals as dance, come 

to feel and think of their bodies. 

 

This intercourse, which had been planned to warm Ann Veronica to a 

familiar affection with Ramage, was certainly warming Ramage to a 

constantly deepening interest in Ann Veronica. He felt that he was 

getting on with her very slowly indeed, but he did not see how he could 

get on faster. He had, he felt, to create certain ideas and vivify 

certain curiosities and feelings in her. Until that was done a certain 

experience of life assured him that a girl is a locked coldness against 

a man's approach. She had all the fascination of being absolutely 

perplexing in this respect. On the one hand, she seemed to think plainly 

and simply, and would talk serenely and freely about topics that most 

women have been trained either to avoid or conceal; and on the other she 

was unconscious, or else she had an air of being unconscious--that was 

the riddle--to all sorts of personal applications that almost any girl 

or woman, one might have thought, would have made. He was always doing 

his best to call her attention to the fact that he was a man of spirit 

and quality and experience, and she a young and beautiful woman, and 

that all sorts of constructions upon their relationship were possible, 

trusting her to go on from that to the idea that all sorts of 

relationships were possible. She responded with an unfaltering 

appearance of insensibility, and never as a young and beautiful woman 

conscious of sex; always in the character of an intelligent girl 

student. 

 

His perception of her personal beauty deepened and quickened with each 

encounter. Every now and then her general presence became radiantly 

dazzling in his eyes; she would appear in the street coming toward him, 

a surprise, so fine and smiling and welcoming was she, so expanded and 

illuminated and living, in contrast with his mere expectation. Or he 

would find something--a wave in her hair, a little line in the contour 

of her brow or neck, that made an exquisite discovery. 

 

He was beginning to think about her inordinately. He would sit in 

his inner office and compose conversations with her, penetrating, 

illuminating, and nearly conclusive--conversations that never proved to 

be of the slightest use at all with her when he met her face to face. 


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