Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

voice. At Christmas he gave her a set of a small edition of Meredith's 

novels, very prettily bound in flexible leather, being guided in the 

choice of an author, as he intimated, rather by her preferences than his 

own. 

 

There was something markedly and deliberately liberal-minded in his 

manner in all their encounters. He conveyed not only his sense of the 

extreme want of correctitude in their unsanctioned meetings, but also 

that, so far as he was concerned, this irregularity mattered not at 

all, that he had flung--and kept on flinging--such considerations to the 

wind. 

 

And, in addition, she was now seeing and talking to Ramage almost 

weekly, on a theory which she took very gravely, that they were 

exceptionally friends. He would ask her to come to dinner with him in 

some little Italian or semi-Bohemian restaurant in the district toward 

Soho, or in one of the more stylish and magnificent establishments about 

Piccadilly Circus, and for the most part she did not care to refuse. 

Nor, indeed, did she want to refuse. These dinners, from their lavish 

display of ambiguous hors d'oeuvre to their skimpy ices in dishes of 

frilled paper, with their Chianti flasks and Parmesan dishes and their 

polyglot waiters and polyglot clientele, were very funny and bright; 

and she really liked Ramage, and valued his help and advice. It was 

interesting to see how different and characteristic his mode of approach 

was to all sorts of questions that interested her, and it was amusing to 

discover this other side to the life of a Morningside Park inhabitant. 

She had thought that all Morningside Park householders came home before 

seven at the latest, as her father usually did. Ramage talked always 

about women or some woman's concern, and very much about Ann Veronica's 

own outlook upon life. He was always drawing contrasts between a woman's 

lot and a man's, and treating her as a wonderful new departure in this 

comparison. Ann Veronica liked their relationship all the more because 

it was an unusual one. 

 

After these dinners they would have a walk, usually to the Thames 

Embankment to see the two sweeps of river on either side of Waterloo 

Bridge; and then they would part at Westminster Bridge, perhaps, and 

he would go on to Waterloo. Once he suggested they should go to a 

music-hall and see a wonderful new dancer, but Ann Veronica did not feel 

she cared to see a new dancer. So, instead, they talked of dancing 


Page 6 from 8:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   8   Forward