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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

with complicated spectacles, who would come every morning as a sort of 

volunteer supplementary demonstrator, look very closely at her work 

and her, tell her that her dissections were "fairish," or "very fairish 

indeed," or "high above the normal female standard," hover as if for 

some outbreak of passionate gratitude and with admiring retrospects 

that made the facetted spectacles gleam like diamonds, return to his own 

place. 

 

The women, Ann Veronica thought, were not quite so interesting as the 

men. There were two school-mistresses, one of whom--Miss Klegg--might 

have been a first cousin to Miss Miniver, she had so many Miniver 

traits; there was a preoccupied girl whose name Ann Veronica never 

learned, but who worked remarkably well; and Miss Garvice, who began 

by attracting her very greatly--she moved so beautifully--and ended by 

giving her the impression that moving beautifully was the beginning and 

end of her being. 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

The next few weeks were a time of the very liveliest thought and growth 

for Ann Veronica. The crowding impressions of the previous weeks seemed 

to run together directly her mind left the chaotic search for employment 

and came into touch again with a coherent and systematic development 

of ideas. The advanced work at the Central Imperial College was in the 

closest touch with living interests and current controversies; it drew 

its illustrations and material from Russell's two great researches--upon 

the relation of the brachiopods to the echinodermata, and upon the 

secondary and tertiary mammalian and pseudo-mammalian factors in the 

free larval forms of various marine organisms. Moreover, a vigorous fire 

of mutual criticism was going on now between the Imperial College and 

the Cambridge Mendelians and echoed in the lectures. From beginning to 

end it was first-hand stuff. 

 

But the influence of the science radiated far beyond its own special 

field--beyond those beautiful but highly technical problems with which 

we do not propose for a moment to trouble the naturally terrified 

reader. Biology is an extraordinarily digestive science. It throws out a 

number of broad experimental generalizations, and then sets out to 

bring into harmony or relation with these an infinitely multifarious 

collection of phenomena. The little streaks upon the germinating area 

of an egg, the nervous movements of an impatient horse, the trick of 

a calculating boy, the senses of a fish, the fungus at the root of a 


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