Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

along with the work on a much easier and more colloquial footing than 

a larger class would have permitted. And a custom had grown up of a 

general tea at four o'clock, under the auspices of a Miss Garvice, a 

tall and graceful girl of distinguished intellectual incompetence, in 

whom the hostess instinct seemed to be abnormally developed. 

 

Capes would come to these teas; he evidently liked to come, and he 

would appear in the doorway of the preparation-room, a pleasing note of 

shyness in his manner, hovering for an invitation. 

 

From the first, Ann Veronica found him an exceptionally interesting man. 

To begin with, he struck her as being the most variable person she had 

ever encountered. At times he was brilliant and masterful, talked round 

and over every one, and would have been domineering if he had not 

been extraordinarily kindly; at times he was almost monosyllabic, and 

defeated Miss Garvice's most skilful attempts to draw him out. Sometimes 

he was obviously irritable and uncomfortable and unfortunate in his 

efforts to seem at ease. And sometimes he overflowed with a peculiarly 

malignant wit that played, with devastating effect, upon any topics that 

had the courage to face it. Ann Veronica's experiences of men had been 

among more stable types--Teddy, who was always absurd; her father, 

who was always authoritative and sentimental; Manning, who was always 

Manning. And most of the others she had met had, she felt, the same 

steadfastness. Goopes, she was sure was always high-browed and slow and 

Socratic. And Ramage too--about Ramage there would always be that air of 

avidity, that air of knowledge and inquiry, the mixture of things in his 

talk that were rather good with things that were rather poor. But one 

could not count with any confidence upon Capes. 

 

The five men students were a mixed company. There was a very white-faced 

youngster of eighteen who brushed back his hair exactly in Russell's 

manner, and was disposed to be uncomfortably silent when he was 

near her, and to whom she felt it was only Christian kindness to be 

consistently pleasant; and a lax young man of five-and-twenty in navy 

blue, who mingled Marx and Bebel with the more orthodox gods of the 

biological pantheon. There was a short, red-faced, resolute youth who 

inherited an authoritative attitude upon bacteriology from his father; 

a Japanese student of unassuming manners who drew beautifully and had 

an imperfect knowledge of English; and a dark, unwashed Scotchman 


Page 3 from 8:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   7   8   Forward