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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

power and patience, Russell pieced together difficulty and suggestion, 

instance and counter-instance, in the elaborate construction of the 

family tree of life. And then the students went into the long laboratory 

and followed out these facts in almost living tissue with microscope and 

scalpel, probe and microtome, and the utmost of their skill and care, 

making now and then a raid into the compact museum of illustration next 

door, in which specimens and models and directions stood in disciplined 

ranks, under the direction of the demonstrator Capes. There was a couple 

of blackboards at each end of the aisle of tables, and at these Capes, 

with quick and nervous speech that contrasted vividly with Russell's 

slow, definitive articulation, directed the dissection and made 

illuminating comments on the structures under examination. Then he 

would come along the laboratory, sitting down by each student in 

turn, checking the work and discussing its difficulties, and answering 

questions arising out of Russell's lecture. 

 

Ann Veronica had come to the Imperial College obsessed by the 

great figure of Russell, by the part he had played in the Darwinian 

controversies, and by the resolute effect of the grim-lipped, yellow, 

leonine face beneath the mane of silvery hair. Capes was rather a 

discovery. Capes was something superadded. Russell burned like a beacon, 

but Capes illuminated by darting flashes and threw light, even if it 

was but momentary light, into a hundred corners that Russell left 

steadfastly in the shade. 

 

Capes was an exceptionally fair man of two or three-and-thirty, so 

ruddily blond that it was a mercy he had escaped light eyelashes, and 

with a minor but by no means contemptible reputation of his own. He 

talked at the blackboard in a pleasant, very slightly lisping voice with 

a curious spontaneity, and was sometimes very clumsy in his exposition, 

and sometimes very vivid. He dissected rather awkwardly and hurriedly, 

but, on the whole, effectively, and drew with an impatient directness 

that made up in significance what it lacked in precision. Across the 

blackboard the colored chalks flew like flights of variously tinted 

rockets as diagram after diagram flickered into being. 

 

There happened that year to be an unusual proportion of girls and women 

in the advanced laboratory, perhaps because the class as a whole was an 

exceptionally small one. It numbered nine, and four of these were women 

students. As a consequence of its small size, it was possible to get 


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