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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

wanted to borrow that money. It did seem in so many ways exactly what 

Ramage said it was--the sensible thing to do. There it was--to be 

borrowed. It would put the whole adventure on a broader and better 

footing; it seemed, indeed, almost the only possible way in which she 

might emerge from her rebellion with anything like success. If only for 

the sake of her argument with her home, she wanted success. And why, 

after all, should she not borrow money from Ramage? 

 

It was so true what he said; middle-class people WERE ridiculously 

squeamish about money. Why should they be? 

 

She and Ramage were friends, very good friends. If she was in a position 

to help him she would help him; only it happened to be the other way 

round. He was in a position to help her. What was the objection? 

 

She found it impossible to look her own diffidence in the face. So she 

went to Ramage and came to the point almost at once. 

 

"Can you spare me forty pounds?" she said. 

 

Mr. Ramage controlled his expression and thought very quickly. 

 

"Agreed," he said, "certainly," and drew a checkbook toward him. 

 

"It's best," he said, "to make it a good round sum. 

 

"I won't give you a check though--Yes, I will. I'll give you an 

uncrossed check, and then you can get it at the bank here, quite close 

by.... You'd better not have all the money on you; you had better 

open a small account in the post-office and draw it out a fiver at a 

time. That won't involve references, as a bank account would--and all 

that sort of thing. The money will last longer, and--it won't bother 

you." 

 

He stood up rather close to her and looked into her eyes. He seemed to 

be trying to understand something very perplexing and elusive. "It's 

jolly," he said, "to feel you have come to me. It's a sort of guarantee 

of confidence. Last time--you made me feel snubbed." 

 

He hesitated, and went off at a tangent. "There's no end of things I'd 

like to talk over with you. It's just upon my lunch-time. Come and have 

lunch with me." 

 

Ann Veronica fenced for a moment. "I don't want to take up your time." 

 

"We won't go to any of these City places. They're just all men, and no 

one is safe from scandal. But I know a little place where we'll get a 

little quiet talk." 

 

Ann Veronica for some indefinable reason did not want to lunch with him, 

a reason indeed so indefinable that she dismissed it, and Ramage went 

through the outer office with her, alert and attentive, to the vivid 

interest of the three clerks. The three clerks fought for the only 


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