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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

serious, they are concentrated on the central reality of life, and a 

little impatient of its--its outer aspects. At least that, I think, is 

what makes a clever woman's independent career so much more difficult 

than a clever man's." 

 

"She doesn't develop a specialty." Ann Veronica was doing her best to 

follow him. 

 

"She has one, that's why. Her specialty is the central thing in life, it 

is life itself, the warmth of life, sex--and love." 

 

He pronounced this with an air of profound conviction and with his 

eyes on Ann Veronica's face. He had an air of having told her a deep, 

personal secret. She winced as he thrust the fact at her, was about to 

answer, and checked herself. She colored faintly. 

 

"That doesn't touch the question I asked you," she said. "It may be 

true, but it isn't quite what I have in mind." 

 

"Of course not," said Ramage, as one who rouses himself from deep 

preoccupations And he began to question her in a business-like way upon 

the steps she had taken and the inquiries she had made. He displayed 

none of the airy optimism of their previous talk over the downland gate. 

He was helpful, but gravely dubious. "You see," he said, "from my point 

of view you're grown up--you're as old as all the goddesses and the 

contemporary of any man alive. But from the--the economic point of view 

you're a very young and altogether inexperienced person." 

 

He returned to and developed that idea. "You're still," he said, "in the 

educational years. From the point of view of most things in the world 

of employment which a woman can do reasonably well and earn a living 

by, you're unripe and half-educated. If you had taken your degree, for 

example." 

 

He spoke of secretarial work, but even there she would need to be able 

to do typing and shorthand. He made it more and more evident to her that 

her proper course was not to earn a salary but to accumulate equipment. 

"You see," he said, "you are like an inaccessible gold-mine in all this 

sort of matter. You're splendid stuff, you know, but you've got nothing 

ready to sell. That's the flat business situation." 

 

He thought. Then he slapped his hand on his desk and looked up with 

the air of a man struck by a brilliant idea. "Look here," he said, 

protruding his eyes; "why get anything to do at all just yet? Why, if 

you must be free, why not do the sensible thing? Make yourself worth 

a decent freedom. Go on with your studies at the Imperial College, 


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