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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

might do or might not do. He--In fact, he--he locked me in my room. 

Practically." 

 

Her breath left her for a moment. 

 

"I SAY!" said Mr. Ramage. 

 

"I wanted to go to an art-student ball of which he disapproved." 

 

"And why shouldn't you?" 

 

"I felt that sort of thing couldn't go on. So I packed up and came to 

London next day." 

 

"To a friend?" 

 

"To lodgings--alone." 

 

"I say, you know, you have some pluck. You did it on your own?" 

 

Ann Veronica smiled. "Quite on my own," she said. 

 

"It's magnificent!" He leaned back and regarded her with his head a 

little on one side. "By Jove!" he said, "there is something direct about 

you. I wonder if I should have locked you up if I'd been your father. 

Luckily I'm not. And you started out forthwith to fight the world and be 

a citizen on your own basis?" He came forward again and folded his hands 

under him on his desk. 

 

"How has the world taken it?" he asked. "If I was the world I think I 

should have put down a crimson carpet, and asked you to say what you 

wanted, and generally walk over me. But the world didn't do that." 

 

"Not exactly." 

 

"It presented a large impenetrable back, and went on thinking about 

something else." 

 

"It offered from fifteen to two-and-twenty shillings a week--for 

drudgery." 

 

"The world has no sense of what is due to youth and courage. It never 

has had." 

 

"Yes," said Ann Veronica. "But the thing is, I want a job." 

 

"Exactly! And so you came along to me. And you see, I don't turn my 

back, and I am looking at you and thinking about you from top to toe." 

 

"And what do you think I ought to do?" 

 

"Exactly!" He lifted a paper-weight and dabbed it gently down again. 

"What ought you to do?" 

 

"I've hunted up all sorts of things." 

 

"The point to note is that fundamentally you don't want particularly to 

do it." 

 

"I don't understand." 

 

"You want to be free and so forth, yes. But you don't particularly 

want to do the job that sets you free--for its own sake. I mean that it 

doesn't interest you in itself." 

 

"I suppose not." 

 

"That's one of our differences. We men are like children. We can get 

absorbed in play, in games, in the business we do. That's really why 

we do them sometimes rather well and get on. But women--women as a rule 

don't throw themselves into things like that. As a matter of fact it 

isn't their affair. And as a natural consequence, they don't do so well, 

and they don't get on--and so the world doesn't pay them. They don't 

catch on to discursive interests, you see, because they are more 


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