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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Part 5 

 

 

In the beginning of December Ann Veronica began to speculate privately 

upon the procedure of pawning. She had decided that she would begin 

with her pearl necklace. She spent a very disagreeable afternoon and 

evening--it was raining fast outside, and she had very unwisely left 

her soundest pair of boots in the boothole of her father's house in 

Morningside Park--thinking over the economic situation and planning a 

course of action. Her aunt had secretly sent on to Ann Veronica some new 

warm underclothing, a dozen pairs of stockings, and her last winter's 

jacket, but the dear lady had overlooked those boots. 

 

These things illuminated her situation extremely. Finally she decided 

upon a step that had always seemed reasonable to her, but that hitherto 

she had, from motives too faint for her to formulate, refrained from 

taking. She resolved to go into the City to Ramage and ask for his 

advice. And next morning she attired herself with especial care and 

neatness, found his address in the Directory at a post-office, and went 

to him. 

 

She had to wait some minutes in an outer office, wherein three young 

men of spirited costume and appearance regarded her with ill-concealed 

curiosity and admiration. Then Ramage appeared with effusion, and 

ushered her into his inner apartment. The three young men exchanged 

expressive glances. 

 

The inner apartment was rather gracefully furnished with a thick, fine 

Turkish carpet, a good brass fender, a fine old bureau, and on the walls 

were engravings of two young girls' heads by Greuze, and of some modern 

picture of boys bathing in a sunlit pool. 

 

"But this is a surprise!" said Ramage. "This is wonderful! I've been 

feeling that you had vanished from my world. Have you been away from 

Morningside Park?" 

 

"I'm not interrupting you?" 

 

"You are. Splendidly. Business exists for such interruptions. There you 

are, the best client's chair." 

 

Ann Veronica sat down, and Ramage's eager eyes feasted on her. 

 

"I've been looking out for you," he said. "I confess it." 

 

She had not, she reflected, remembered how prominent his eyes were. 

 

"I want some advice," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"Yes?" 

 

"You remember once, how we talked--at a gate on the Downs? We talked 

about how a girl might get an independent living." 

 

"Yes, yes." 

 

"Well, you see, something has happened at home." 

 

She paused. 

 

"Nothing has happened to Mr. Stanley?" 

 

"I've fallen out with my father. It was about--a question of what I 


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