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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

tires of resistance, and when it meets again and again, incoherently 

active, the same phrases, the same ideas that it has already slain, 

exposed and dissected and buried, it becomes less and less energetic to 

repeat the operation. There must be something, one feels, in ideas that 

achieve persistently a successful resurrection. What Miss Miniver would 

have called the Higher Truth supervenes. 

 

Yet through these talks, these meetings and conferences, these movements 

and efforts, Ann Veronica, for all that she went with her friend, and 

at times applauded with her enthusiastically, yet went nevertheless with 

eyes that grew more and more puzzled, and fine eyebrows more and more 

disposed to knit. She was with these movements--akin to them, she felt 

it at times intensely--and yet something eluded her. Morningside Park 

had been passive and defective; all this rushed about and was active, 

but it was still defective. It still failed in something. It did seem 

germane to the matter that so many of the people "in the van" were plain 

people, or faded people, or tired-looking people. It did affect the 

business that they all argued badly and were egotistical in their 

manners and inconsistent in their phrases. There were moments when she 

doubted whether the whole mass of movements and societies and gatherings 

and talks was not simply one coherent spectacle of failure protecting 

itself from abjection by the glamour of its own assertions. It happened 

that at the extremest point of Ann Veronica's social circle from the 

Widgetts was the family of the Morningside Park horse-dealer, a company 

of extremely dressy and hilarious young women, with one equestrian 

brother addicted to fancy waistcoats, cigars, and facial spots. These 

girls wore hats at remarkable angles and bows to startle and kill; they 

liked to be right on the spot every time and up to everything that 

was it from the very beginning and they rendered their conception of 

Socialists and all reformers by the words "positively frightening" 

and "weird." Well, it was beyond dispute that these words did convey 

a certain quality of the Movements in general amid which Miss Miniver 

disported herself. They WERE weird. And yet for all that-- 

 

It got into Ann Veronica's nights at last and kept her awake, the 

perplexing contrast between the advanced thought and the advanced 

thinker. The general propositions of Socialism, for example, struck her 


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