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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

practising the plastic arts, young writers, young men in employment, a 

very large proportion of girls and women--self-supporting women or girls 

of the student class. They made a stratum into which Ann Veronica was 

now plunged up to her neck; it had become her stratum. 

 

None of the things they said and did were altogether new to Ann 

Veronica, but now she got them massed and alive, instead of by glimpses 

or in books--alive and articulate and insistent. The London backgrounds, 

in Bloomsbury and Marylebone, against which these people went to 

and fro, took on, by reason of their gray facades, their implacably 

respectable windows and window-blinds, their reiterated unmeaning iron 

railings, a stronger and stronger suggestion of the flavor of her father 

at his most obdurate phase, and of all that she felt herself fighting 

against. 

 

She was already a little prepared by her discursive reading and 

discussion under the Widgett influence for ideas and "movements," though 

temperamentally perhaps she was rather disposed to resist and criticise 

than embrace them. But the people among whom she was now thrown through 

the social exertions of Miss Miniver and the Widgetts--for Teddy and 

Hetty came up from Morningside Park and took her to an eighteen-penny 

dinner in Soho and introduced her to some art students, who were also 

Socialists, and so opened the way to an evening of meandering talk in a 

studio--carried with them like an atmosphere this implication, not only 

that the world was in some stupid and even obvious way WRONG, with which 

indeed she was quite prepared to agree, but that it needed only a 

few pioneers to behave as such and be thoroughly and indiscriminately 

"advanced," for the new order to achieve itself. 

 

When ninety per cent. out of the ten or twelve people one meets in a 

month not only say but feel and assume a thing, it is very hard not 

to fall into the belief that the thing is so. Imperceptibly almost Ann 

Veronica began to acquire the new attitude, even while her mind still 

resisted the felted ideas that went with it. And Miss Miniver began to 

sway her. 

 

The very facts that Miss Miniver never stated an argument clearly, that 

she was never embarrassed by a sense of self-contradiction, and had 

little more respect for consistency of statement than a washerwoman 

has for wisps of vapor, which made Ann Veronica critical and hostile at 

their first encounter in Morningside Park, became at last with constant 

association the secret of Miss Miniver's growing influence. The brain 


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