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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

of the gallery at Essex Hall, and heard and saw the giant leaders of the 

Fabian Society who are re-making the world: Bernard Shaw and Toomer and 

Doctor Tumpany and Wilkins the author, all displayed upon a platform. 

The place was crowded, and the people about her were almost equally 

made up of very good-looking and enthusiastic young people and a great 

variety of Goopes-like types. In the discussion there was the oddest 

mixture of things that were personal and petty with an idealist devotion 

that was fine beyond dispute. In nearly every speech she heard was the 

same implication of great and necessary changes in the world--changes 

to be won by effort and sacrifice indeed, but surely to be won. And 

afterward she saw a very much larger and more enthusiastic gathering, 

a meeting of the advanced section of the woman movement in Caxton Hall, 

where the same note of vast changes in progress sounded; and she went 

to a soiree of the Dress Reform Association and visited a Food Reform 

Exhibition, where imminent change was made even alarmingly visible. 

The women's meeting was much more charged with emotional force than the 

Socialists'. Ann Veronica was carried off her intellectual and critical 

feet by it altogether, and applauded and uttered cries that subsequent 

reflection failed to endorse. "I knew you would feel it," said Miss 

Miniver, as they came away flushed and heated. "I knew you would begin 

to see how it all falls into place together." 

 

It did begin to fall into place together. She became more and more 

alive, not so much to a system of ideas as to a big diffused 

impulse toward change, to a great discontent with and criticism of 

life as it is lived, to a clamorous confusion of ideas for 

reconstruction--reconstruction of the methods of business, of economic 

development, of the rules of property, of the status of children, of the 

clothing and feeding and teaching of every one; she developed a quite 

exaggerated consciousness of a multitude of people going about the 

swarming spaces of London with their minds full, their talk and gestures 

full, their very clothing charged with the suggestion of the urgency of 

this pervasive project of alteration. Some indeed carried themselves, 

dressed themselves even, rather as foreign visitors from the land 

of "Looking Backward" and "News from Nowhere" than as the indigenous 

Londoners they were. For the most part these were detached people: men 


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