Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

But the young man with the orange tie remained in his place, disputing 

whether the body had not something or other which he called its 

legitimate claims. And from that they came back by way of the Kreutzer 

Sonata and Resurrection to Tolstoy again. 

 

So the talk went on. Goopes, who had at first been a little reserved, 

resorted presently to the Socratic method to restrain the young man with 

the orange tie, and bent his forehead over him, and brought out at last 

very clearly from him that the body was only illusion and everything 

nothing but just spirit and molecules of thought. It became a sort of 

duel at last between them, and all the others sat and listened--every 

one, that is, except the Alderman, who had got the blond young man into 

a corner by the green-stained dresser with the aluminum things, and was 

sitting with his back to every one else, holding one hand over his mouth 

for greater privacy, and telling him, with an accent of confidential 

admission, in whispers of the chronic struggle between the natural 

modesty and general inoffensiveness of the Borough Council and the 

social evil in Marylebone. 

 

So the talk went on, and presently they were criticising novelists, and 

certain daring essays of Wilkins got their due share of attention, 

and then they were discussing the future of the theatre. Ann Veronica 

intervened a little in the novelist discussion with a defence of Esmond 

and a denial that the Egoist was obscure, and when she spoke every one 

else stopped talking and listened. Then they deliberated whether Bernard 

Shaw ought to go into Parliament. And that brought them to vegetarianism 

and teetotalism, and the young man in the orange tie and Mrs. Goopes 

had a great set-to about the sincerity of Chesterton and Belloc that was 

ended by Goopes showing signs of resuming the Socratic method. 

 

And at last Ann Veronica and Miss Miniver came down the dark staircase 

and out into the foggy spaces of the London squares, and crossed Russell 

Square, Woburn Square, Gordon Square, making an oblique route to Ann 

Veronica's lodging. They trudged along a little hungry, because of the 

fruitarian refreshments, and mentally very active. And Miss Miniver fell 

discussing whether Goopes or Bernard Shaw or Tolstoy or Doctor Tumpany 

or Wilkins the author had the more powerful and perfect mind in 

existence at the present time. She was clear there were no other minds 

like them in all the world. 

 

 

 

 

Part 4 

 

 

Then one evening Ann Veronica went with Miss Miniver into the back seats 


Page 4 from 8:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   6   7   8   Forward