Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

appealed to Ann Veronica whether she did not feel the same; and Mr. 

Goopes said that we must distinguish between sincerity and irony, which 

was often indeed no more than sincerity at the sublimated level. 

 

Alderman Dunstable said that sincerity was often a matter of 

opportunity, and illustrated the point to the fair young man with an 

anecdote about Blinders on the Dust Destructor Committee, during which 

the young man in the orange tie succeeded in giving the whole discussion 

a daring and erotic flavor by questioning whether any one could be 

perfectly sincere in love. 

 

Miss Miniver thought that there was no true sincerity except in love, 

and appealed to Ann Veronica, but the young man in the orange tie went 

on to declare that it was quite possible to be sincerely in love with 

two people at the same time, although perhaps on different planes with 

each individual, and deceiving them both. But that brought Mrs. Goopes 

down on him with the lesson Titian teaches so beautifully in his "Sacred 

and Profane Love," and became quite eloquent upon the impossibility of 

any deception in the former. 

 

Then they discoursed on love for a time, and Alderman Dunstable, turning 

back to the shy, blond young man and speaking in undertones of the 

utmost clearness, gave a brief and confidential account of an unfounded 

rumor of the bifurcation of the affections of Blinders that had led to a 

situation of some unpleasantness upon the Borough Council. 

 

The very old lady in the antimacassar touched Ann Veronica's arm 

suddenly, and said, in a deep, arch voice: 

 

"Talking of love again; spring again, love again. Oh! you young people!" 

 

The young man with the orange tie, in spite of Sisyphus-like efforts 

on the part of Goopes to get the topic on to a higher plane, displayed 

great persistence in speculating upon the possible distribution of the 

affections of highly developed modern types. 

 

The old lady in the antimacassar said, abruptly, "Ah! you young people, 

you young people, if you only knew!" and then laughed and then mused in 

a marked manner; and the young man with the narrow forehead and glasses 

cleared his throat and asked the young man in the orange tie whether he 

believed that Platonic love was possible. Mrs. Goopes said she believed 

in nothing else, and with that she glanced at Ann Veronica, rose a 

little abruptly, and directed Goopes and the shy young man in the 

handing of refreshments. 


Page 3 from 8:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   6   7   8   Forward