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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

and Mrs. Alderman Dunstable, of the Borough Council of Marylebone. 

These were seated in an imperfect semicircle about a very copper-adorned 

fireplace, surmounted by a carved wood inscription: 

 

"DO IT NOW." 

 

And to them were presently added a roguish-looking young man, with 

reddish hair, an orange tie, and a fluffy tweed suit, and others who, 

in Ann Veronica's memory, in spite of her efforts to recall details, 

remained obstinately just "others." 

 

The talk was animated, and remained always brilliant in form even when 

it ceased to be brilliant in substance. There were moments when Ann 

Veronica rather more than suspected the chief speakers to be, as 

school-boys say, showing off at her. 

 

They talked of a new substitute for dripping in vegetarian cookery that 

Mrs. Goopes was convinced exercised an exceptionally purifying influence 

on the mind. And then they talked of Anarchism and Socialism, and 

whether the former was the exact opposite of the latter or only a higher 

form. The reddish-haired young man contributed allusions to the Hegelian 

philosophy that momentarily confused the discussion. Then Alderman 

Dunstable, who had hitherto been silent, broke out into speech and went 

off at a tangent, and gave his personal impressions of quite a number 

of his fellow-councillors. He continued to do this for the rest of the 

evening intermittently, in and out, among other topics. He addressed 

himself chiefly to Goopes, and spoke as if in reply to long-sustained 

inquiries on the part of Goopes into the personnel of the Marylebone 

Borough Council. "If you were to ask me," he would say, "I should say 

Blinders is straight. An ordinary type, of course--" 

 

Mrs. Dunstable's contributions to the conversation were entirely in the 

form of nods; whenever Alderman Dunstable praised or blamed she nodded 

twice or thrice, according to the requirements of his emphasis. And 

she seemed always to keep one eye on Ann Veronica's dress. Mrs. 

Goopes disconcerted the Alderman a little by abruptly challenging the 

roguish-looking young man in the orange tie (who, it seemed, was the 

assistant editor of New Ideas) upon a critique of Nietzsche and Tolstoy 

that had appeared in his paper, in which doubts had been cast upon the 

perfect sincerity of the latter. Everybody seemed greatly concerned 

about the sincerity of Tolstoy. 

 

Miss Miniver said that if once she lost her faith in Tolstoy's 

sincerity, nothing she felt would really matter much any more, and she 


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