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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

demonstrating and suffragetting upon some independent notions of its 

own. Her fingers were bursting through her gloves, as if to get at once 

into touch with Ann Veronica. "You're Glorious!" said Miss Miniver in 

tones of rapture, holding a hand in each of hers and peering up into Ann 

Veronica's face. "Glorious! You're so calm, dear, and so resolute, so 

serene! 

 

"It's girls like you who will show them what We are," said Miss Miniver; 

"girls whose spirits have not been broken!" 

 

Ann Veronica sunned herself a little in this warmth. 

 

"I was watching you at Morningside Park, dear," said Miss Miniver. "I am 

getting to watch all women. I thought then perhaps you didn't care, that 

you were like so many of them. NOW it's just as though you had grown up 

suddenly." 

 

She stopped, and then suggested: "I wonder--I should love--if it was 

anything _I_ said." 

 

She did not wait for Ann Veronica's reply. She seemed to assume that it 

must certainly be something she had said. "They all catch on," she said. 

"It spreads like wildfire. This is such a grand time! Such a glorious 

time! There never was such a time as this! Everything seems so close to 

fruition, so coming on and leading on! The Insurrection of Women! They 

spring up everywhere. Tell me all that happened, one sister-woman to 

another." 

 

She chilled Ann Veronica a little by that last phrase, and yet the 

magnetism of her fellowship and enthusiasm was very strong; and it was 

pleasant to be made out a heroine after so much expostulation and so 

many secret doubts. 

 

But she did not listen long; she wanted to talk. She sat, crouched 

together, by the corner of the hearthrug under the bookcase that 

supported the pig's skull, and looked into the fire and up at Ann 

Veronica's face, and let herself go. "Let us put the lamp out," she 

said; "the flames are ever so much better for talking," and Ann Veronica 

agreed. "You are coming right out into life--facing it all." 

 

Ann Veronica sat with her chin on her hand, red-lit and saying little, 

and Miss Miniver discoursed. As she talked, the drift and significance 

of what she was saying shaped itself slowly to Ann Veronica's 

apprehension. It presented itself in the likeness of a great, gray, dull 

world--a brutal, superstitious, confused, and wrong-headed world, 

that hurt people and limited people unaccountably. In remote times and 

countries its evil tendencies had expressed themselves in the form of 

tyrannies, massacres, wars, and what not; but just at present in England 


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