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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

civility and admiration and terror. There was also a curious interview 

at a big hotel with a middle-aged, white-powdered woman, all covered 

with jewels and reeking of scent, who wanted a Companion. She did not 

think Ann Veronica would do as her companion. 

 

And nearly all these things were fearfully ill-paid. They carried no 

more than bare subsistence wages; and they demanded all her time and 

energy. She had heard of women journalists, women writers, and so 

forth; but she was not even admitted to the presence of the editors she 

demanded to see, and by no means sure that if she had been she could 

have done any work they might have given her. One day she desisted from 

her search and went unexpectedly to the Tredgold College. Her place 

was not filled; she had been simply noted as absent, and she did a 

comforting day of admirable dissection upon the tortoise. She was so 

interested, and this was such a relief from the trudging anxiety of her 

search for work, that she went on for a whole week as if she was still 

living at home. Then a third secretarial opening occurred and renewed 

her hopes again: a position as amanuensis--with which some of the 

lighter duties of a nurse were combined--to an infirm gentleman of means 

living at Twickenham, and engaged upon a great literary research to 

prove that the "Faery Queen" was really a treatise upon molecular 

chemistry written in a peculiar and picturesquely handled cipher. 

 

 

 

Part 2 

 

 

Now, while Ann Veronica was taking these soundings in the industrial 

sea, and measuring herself against the world as it is, she was also 

making extensive explorations among the ideas and attitudes of a number 

of human beings who seemed to be largely concerned with the world as it 

ought to be. She was drawn first by Miss Miniver, and then by her own 

natural interest, into a curious stratum of people who are busied with 

dreams of world progress, of great and fundamental changes, of a New Age 

that is to replace all the stresses and disorders of contemporary life. 

 

Miss Miniver learned of her flight and got her address from the 

Widgetts. She arrived about nine o'clock the next evening in a state of 

tremulous enthusiasm. She followed the landlady half way up-stairs, and 

called up to Ann Veronica, "May I come up? It's me! You know--Nettie 

Miniver!" She appeared before Ann Veronica could clearly recall who 

Nettie Miniver might be. 

 

There was a wild light in her eye, and her straight hair was out 


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