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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Goddesses, but in practice--well, look, for example, at the stream of 

girls one meets going to work of a morning, round-shouldered, cheap, and 

underfed! They aren't queens, and no one is treating them as queens. 

And look, again, at the women one finds letting lodgings.... I was 

looking for rooms last week. It got on my nerves--the women I saw. Worse 

than any man. Everywhere I went and rapped at a door I found behind it 

another dreadful dingy woman--another fallen queen, I suppose--dingier 

than the last, dirty, you know, in grain. Their poor hands!" 

 

"I know," said Mr. Manning, with entirely suitable emotion. 

 

"And think of the ordinary wives and mothers, with their anxiety, their 

limitations, their swarms of children!" 

 

Mr. Manning displayed distress. He fended these things off from him with 

the rump of his fourth piece of cake. "I know that our social order is 

dreadful enough," he said, "and sacrifices all that is best and most 

beautiful in life. I don't defend it." 

 

"And besides, when it comes to the idea of queens," Ann Veronica went 

on, "there's twenty-one and a half million women to twenty million men. 

Suppose our proper place is a shrine. Still, that leaves over a million 

shrines short, not reckoning widows who re-marry. And more boys die than 

girls, so that the real disproportion among adults is even greater." 

 

"I know," said Mr Manning, "I know these Dreadful Statistics. I know 

there's a sort of right in your impatience at the slowness of Progress. 

But tell me one thing I don't understand--tell me one thing: How can you 

help it by coming down into the battle and the mire? That's the thing 

that concerns me." 

 

"Oh, I'm not trying to help it," said Ann Veronica. "I'm only arguing 

against your position of what a woman should be, and trying to get 

it clear in my own mind. I'm in this apartment and looking for work 

because--Well, what else can I do, when my father practically locks me 

up?" 

 

"I know," said Mr. Manning, "I know. Don't think I can't sympathize and 

understand. Still, here we are in this dingy, foggy city. Ye gods! what 

a wilderness it is! Every one trying to get the better of every one, 

every one regardless of every one--it's one of those days when every one 

bumps against you--every one pouring coal smoke into the air and making 

confusion worse confounded, motor omnibuses clattering and smelling, 

a horse down in the Tottenham Court Road, an old woman at the corner 


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