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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

revised by Mr. Haldane and the London School of Economics and finished 

in the Keltic school. 

 

"It's unforgivable of me to call, Miss Stanley," he said, shaking hands 

in a peculiar, high, fashionable manner; "but you know you said we might 

be friends." 

 

"It's dreadful for you to be here," he said, indicating the yellow 

presence of the first fog of the year without, "but your aunt told me 

something of what had happened. It's just like your Splendid Pride to do 

it. Quite!" 

 

He sat in the arm-chair and took tea, and consumed several of the 

extra cakes which she had sent out for and talked to her and expressed 

himself, looking very earnestly at her with his deep-set eyes, and 

carefully avoiding any crumbs on his mustache the while. Ann Veronica 

sat firelit by her tea-tray with, quite unconsciously, the air of an 

expert hostess. 

 

"But how is it all going to end?" said Mr. Manning. 

 

"Your father, of course," he said, "must come to realize just how 

Splendid you are! He doesn't understand. I've seen him, and he doesn't 

a bit understand. _I_ didn't understand before that letter. It makes me 

want to be just everything I CAN be to you. You're like some splendid 

Princess in Exile in these Dreadful Dingy apartments!" 

 

"I'm afraid I'm anything but a Princess when it comes to earning a 

salary," said Ann Veronica. "But frankly, I mean to fight this through 

if I possibly can." 

 

"My God!" said Manning, in a stage-aside. "Earning a salary!" 

 

"You're like a Princess in Exile!" he repeated, overruling her. "You 

come into these sordid surroundings--you mustn't mind my calling them 

sordid--and it makes them seem as though they didn't matter.... I 

don't think they do matter. I don't think any surroundings could throw a 

shadow on you." 

 

Ann Veronica felt a slight embarrassment. "Won't you have some more tea, 

Mr. Manning?" she asked. 

 

"You know--," said Mr. Manning, relinquishing his cup without answering 

her question, "when I hear you talk of earning a living, it's as if I 

heard of an archangel going on the Stock Exchange--or Christ selling 

doves.... Forgive my daring. I couldn't help the thought." 

 

"It's a very good image," said Ann Veronica. 

 

"I knew you wouldn't mind." 

 

"But does it correspond with the facts of the case? You know, Mr. 

Manning, all this sort of thing is very well as sentiment, but does it 

correspond with the realities? Are women truly such angelic things and 

men so chivalrous? You men have, I know, meant to make us Queens and 


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