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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

bone. You square the G.V., and go home before you have to. That's my 

advice. If you don't eat humble-pie now you may live to fare worse 

later. _I_ can't help you a cent. Life's hard enough nowadays for an 

unprotected male. Let alone a girl. You got to take the world as it is, 

and the only possible trade for a girl that isn't sweated is to get hold 

of a man and make him do it for her. It's no good flying out at that, 

Vee; _I_ didn't arrange it. It's Providence. That's how things are; 

that's the order of the world. Like appendicitis. It isn't pretty, but 

we're made so. Rot, no doubt; but we can't alter it. You go home and 

live on the G.V., and get some other man to live on as soon as possible. 

It isn't sentiment but it's horse sense. All this Woman-who-Diddery--no 

damn good. After all, old P.--Providence, I mean--HAS arranged it so 

that men will keep you, more or less. He made the universe on those 

lines. You've got to take what you can get." 

 

That was the quintessence of her brother Roddy. 

 

He played variations on this theme for the better part of an hour. 

 

"You go home," he said, at parting; "you go home. It's all very fine and 

all that, Vee, this freedom, but it isn't going to work. The world isn't 

ready for girls to start out on their own yet; that's the plain fact of 

the case. Babies and females have got to keep hold of somebody or go 

under--anyhow, for the next few generations. You go home and wait a 

century, Vee, and then try again. Then you may have a bit of a chance. 

Now you haven't the ghost of one--not if you play the game fair." 

 

 

 

Part 6 

 

 

It was remarkable to Ann Veronica how completely Mr. Manning, in his 

entirely different dialect, indorsed her brother Roddy's view of things. 

He came along, he said, just to call, with large, loud apologies, 

radiantly kind and good. Miss Stanley, it was manifest, had given him 

Ann Veronica's address. The kindly faced landlady had failed to catch 

his name, and said he was a tall, handsome gentleman with a great black 

mustache. Ann Veronica, with a sigh at the cost of hospitality, made a 

hasty negotiation for an extra tea and for a fire in the ground-floor 

apartment, and preened herself carefully for the interview. In the 

little apartment, under the gas chandelier, his inches and his stoop 

were certainly very effective. In the bad light he looked at once 

military and sentimental and studious, like one of Ouida's guardsmen 


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