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Table of contents
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Part 5 

 

 

After the interview Ann Veronica considered herself formally cut off 

from home. If nothing else had clinched that, the purse had. 

 

Nevertheless there came a residuum of expostulations. Her brother Roddy, 

who was in the motor line, came to expostulate; her sister Alice wrote. 

And Mr. Manning called. 

 

Her sister Alice seemed to have developed a religious sense away there 

in Yorkshire, and made appeals that had no meaning for Ann Veronica's 

mind. She exhorted Ann Veronica not to become one of "those unsexed 

intellectuals, neither man nor woman." 

 

Ann Veronica meditated over that phrase. "That's HIM," said Ann 

Veronica, in sound, idiomatic English. "Poor old Alice!" 

 

Her brother Roddy came to her and demanded tea, and asked her to state 

a case. "Bit thick on the old man, isn't it?" said Roddy, who had 

developed a bluff, straightforward style in the motor shop. 

 

"Mind my smoking?" said Roddy. "I don't see quite what your game is, 

Vee, but I suppose you've got a game on somewhere. 

 

"Rummy lot we are!" said Roddy. "Alice--Alice gone dotty, and all over 

kids. Gwen--I saw Gwen the other day, and the paint's thicker than ever. 

Jim is up to the neck in Mahatmas and Theosophy and Higher Thought and 

rot--writes letters worse than Alice. And now YOU'RE on the war-path. I 

believe I'm the only sane member of the family left. The G.V.'s as mad 

as any of you, in spite of all his respectability; not a bit of him 

straight anywhere, not one bit." 

 

"Straight?" 

 

"Not a bit of it! He's been out after eight per cent. since the 

beginning. Eight per cent.! He'll come a cropper one of these days, 

if you ask me. He's been near it once or twice already. That's got his 

nerves to rags. I suppose we're all human beings really, but what price 

the sacred Institution of the Family! Us as a bundle! Eh?... I don't 

half disagree with you, Vee, really; only thing is, I don't see 

how you're going to pull it off. A home MAY be a sort of cage, but 

still--it's a home. Gives you a right to hang on to the old man until he 

busts--practically. Jolly hard life for a girl, getting a living. Not MY 

affair." 

 

He asked questions and listened to her views for a time. 

 

"I'd chuck this lark right off if I were you, Vee," he said. "I'm five 

years older than you, and no end wiser, being a man. What you're after 

is too risky. It's a damned hard thing to do. It's all very handsome 

starting out on your own, but it's too damned hard. That's my opinion, 

if you ask me. There's nothing a girl can do that isn't sweated to the 


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