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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

pernicious rascals. We can't even protect them from themselves." 

 

An immense gulf seemed to open between father and daughter as he said 

these words. 

 

"I don't see," gasped Ann Veronica, "why parents and children... 

shouldn't be friends." 

 

"Friends!" said her father. "When we see you going through disobedience 

to the devil! Come, Molly, she must go her own way. I've tried to use my 

authority. And she defies me. What more is there to be said? She defies 

me!" 

 

It was extraordinary. Ann Veronica felt suddenly an effect of tremendous 

pathos; she would have given anything to have been able to frame and 

make some appeal, some utterance that should bridge this bottomless 

chasm that had opened between her and her father, and she could find 

nothing whatever to say that was in the least sincere and appealing. 

 

"Father," she cried, "I have to live!" 

 

He misunderstood her. "That," he said, grimly, with his hand on the 

door-handle, "must be your own affair, unless you choose to live at 

Morningside Park." 

 

Miss Stanley turned to her. "Vee," she said, "come home. Before it is 

too late." 

 

"Come, Molly," said Mr. Stanley, at the door. 

 

"Vee!" said Miss Stanley, "you hear what your father says!" 

 

Miss Stanley struggled with emotion. She made a curious movement toward 

her niece, then suddenly, convulsively, she dabbed down something lumpy 

on the table and turned to follow her brother. Ann Veronica stared for a 

moment in amazement at this dark-green object that clashed as it was 

put down. It was a purse. She made a step forward. "Aunt!" she said, "I 

can't--" 

 

Then she caught a wild appeal in her aunt's blue eye, halted, and the 

door clicked upon them. 

 

There was a pause, and then the front door slammed.... 

 

Ann Veronica realized that she was alone with the world. And this time 

the departure had a tremendous effect of finality. She had to resist an 

impulse of sheer terror, to run out after them and give in. 

 

"Gods," she said, at last, "I've done it this time!" 

 

"Well!" She took up the neat morocco purse, opened it, and examined the 

contents. 

 

It contained three sovereigns, six and fourpence, two postage stamps, a 

small key, and her aunt's return half ticket to Morningside Park. 


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