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ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-1-2
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-3-4
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-5-6
ANN VERONICA TALKS TO HER FATHER-7
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-1-2
ANN VERONICA GATHERS POINTS OF VIEW-3
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-1-2
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-3-4-5
THE MORNING OF THE CRISIS-6-7
THE CRISIS-1-2-3-4
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-1-2-3
THE FLIGHT TO LONDON-4-5-6
EXPOSTULATIONS-1-2-3-4
EXPOSTULATIONS-5-6
IDEALS AND A REALITY-1-2
IDEALS AND A REALITY-3-4
IDEALS AND A REALITY-5-6-7
BIOLOGY-1-2
BIOLOGY-3-4-5-6
BIOLOGY-7-8-9
DISCORDS-1
DISCORDS-2-3-4
DISCORDS-5-6-8-9
THE SUFFRAGETTES-1-2-3
THE SUFFRAGETTES-4-5
THOUGHTS IN PRISON-1-2-3-4-5-6
ANN VERONICA PUTS THINGS IN ORDER-1-2-3-4-5-6-7
THE SAPPHIRE RING-1-2-3-4
THE SAPPHIRE RING-5-6
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-1-2-3
THE COLLAPSE OF THE PENITENT-4-5-6
THE LAST DAYS AT HOME-1-2-3
IN THE MOUNTAINS-1-2-3-4
IN THE MOUNTAINS-5-6-7-8-9-10-11
IN PERSPECTIVE-1-2-3

Mr. Stanley used his authority, and commanded Ann Veronica to come home, 

to which, of course, she said she wouldn't; and then he warned her not 

to defy him, warned her very solemnly, and then commanded her again. 

He then said that if she would not obey him in this course she should 

"never darken his doors again," and was, indeed, frightfully abusive. 

This threat terrified Ann Veronica so much that she declared with sobs 

and vehemence that she would never come home again, and for a time both 

talked at once and very wildly. He asked her whether she understood what 

she was saying, and went on to say still more precisely that she should 

never touch a penny of his money until she came home again--not one 

penny. Ann Veronica said she didn't care. 

 

Then abruptly Mr. Stanley changed his key. "You poor child!" he said; 

"don't you see the infinite folly of these proceedings? Think! Think of 

the love and affection you abandon! Think of your aunt, a second mother 

to you. Think if your own mother was alive!" 

 

He paused, deeply moved. 

 

"If my own mother was alive," sobbed Ann Veronica, "she would 

understand." 

 

The talk became more and more inconclusive and exhausting. Ann Veronica 

found herself incompetent, undignified, and detestable, holding on 

desperately to a hardening antagonism to her father, quarrelling with 

him, wrangling with him, thinking of repartees--almost as if he was a 

brother. It was horrible, but what could she do? She meant to live 

her own life, and he meant, with contempt and insults, to prevent her. 

Anything else that was said she now regarded only as an aspect of or 

diversion from that. 

 

In the retrospect she was amazed to think how things had gone to pieces, 

for at the outset she had been quite prepared to go home again upon 

terms. While waiting for his coming she had stated her present 

and future relations with him with what had seemed to her the most 

satisfactory lucidity and completeness. She had looked forward to an 

explanation. Instead had come this storm, this shouting, this weeping, 

this confusion of threats and irrelevant appeals. It was not only that 

her father had said all sorts of inconsistent and unreasonable things, 

but that by some incomprehensible infection she herself had replied in 

the same vein. He had assumed that her leaving home was the point at 

issue, that everything turned on that, and that the sole alternative was 

obedience, and she had fallen in with that assumption until rebellion 


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